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Technology Gap and Cumulative Growth: Models and outcomes

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  • Fulvio Castellacci

Abstract

Addressing the question of why productivity growth rates differ between countries from a disequilibrium standpoint, the paper explores the possibility of combining in a single formalisation two different but complementary theories of technical change and macroeconomic growth--namely the Kaldorian idea of cumulative causation and the technology-gap approach to economic growth. In order to investigate the complementarities between these two approaches, a two-country macroeconomic model of technology-gap and cumulative growth is presented. The analytical solutions of the model for the growth rates of productivity and demand, and the dynamics of the technology-gap show the existence of a large set of possible outcomes: the follower country can fall behind, partly or totally catch up, or overtake the leader. Moreover, even if the follower is able to close the technology-gap, it will not necessarily be able to close the growth rate differential. The empirical evidence on the experience of 26 OECD countries during 1991-99 shows the relevance of the model for explaining the recent performance of technological activities and productivity growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Fulvio Castellacci, 2002. "Technology Gap and Cumulative Growth: Models and outcomes," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 333-346.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:16:y:2002:i:3:p:333-346
    DOI: 10.1080/02692170210136154
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
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    3. Fagerberg, Jan, 1987. "A technology gap approach to why growth rates differ," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2-4), pages 87-99, August.
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    5. Dixon, R & Thirlwall, A P, 1975. "A Model of Regional Growth-Rate Differences on Kaldorian Lines," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 201-214, July.
    6. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    7. Young, Allyn A., 1928. "Increasing Returns and Economic Progress," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 38, pages 527-542.
    8. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lavopa, A., 2014. "Catching up and lagging behind in a balance-of-payments-constrained dual economy," MERIT Working Papers 042, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Bilge Erten, 2010. "Industrial Upgrading and Export Diversification: A Comparative Analysis of Economic Policies in Turkey and Malaysia," Working Papers id:2778, eSocialSciences.
    3. Elias Soukiazis & Micaela Antunes, 2013. "Growth Performance in Portugal since the 1960s: A Simultaneous Equation Approach with Cumulative Causation Characteristics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 169-192.
    4. Fulvio Castellacci, 2004. "A neo-Schumpeterian Approach to Why Growth Rates Differ," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 55(6), pages 1145-1169.
    5. Fulvio Castellacci & Isabel Alvarez, 2006. "Innovation, Diffusion and Cumulative Causation: Changes in the Spanish Growth Regime, 1960-2001," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 223-241.
    6. Ewa Lechman, 2013. "Does Technology Adoption Matter For Economic Development? An Empirical Evidence For Latin American Countries," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 17, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    7. Gabriel, Luciano Ferreira & Jayme, Frederico G. & Oreiro, José Luis, 2016. "A North-South Model of Economic Growth, Technological Gap, Structural Change and Real Exchange Rate," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 83-94.
    8. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2006. "Innovation, diffusion and catching up in the fifth long wave," MPRA Paper 27521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Gómez, Jaime & Vargas, Pilar, 2012. "Intangible resources and technology adoption in manufacturing firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(9), pages 1607-1619.
    10. Ewa Lechman, 2013. "ICTs diffusion trajectories and economic development – an empirical evidence for 46 developing countries," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 18, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    11. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2008. "Technology clubs, technology gaps and growth trajectories," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 301-314, December.
    12. Nebojša Stojcic & Heri Bezic, 2012. "Restructuring and Barriers: Cross-Country Evidence on the Competitiveness of Exporters in Transition," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 10(2 (Summer), pages 145-170.
    13. Botta, Alberto, 2009. "A structuralist North-South model on structural change, economic growth and catching-up," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 61-73, March.

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