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Are OECD Export Specialisation Patterns 'Sticky'? Relations to the Convergence-Divergence Debate

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  • Bent Dalum
  • Gert Villumsen

Abstract

The aim of the present paper is twofold. We want to present and test a methodology capable to deal more satisfactorily with the question of stability of international export specialisation patterns and, secondly, we want to relate this issue to the convergence-divergence debate in growth theory and the rapidly increasing strand of literature on national systems of innovation.We conclude that the relative export structures are moving together in the long term. However, the speed of convergence is fairly slow, indicating that national export specialisation patterns are quite stubborn or 'sticky'. These findings are complementary to the new knowledge generated wit convergence-divergence debate in growth theory and the rapidly increasing strand of literature on natonal systems of innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • Bent Dalum & Gert Villumsen, 1996. "Are OECD Export Specialisation Patterns 'Sticky'? Relations to the Convergence-Divergence Debate," DRUID Working Papers 96-3, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aal:abbswp:96-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Gugler & Michael Pfaffermayr, 2004. "Convergence in Structure and Productivity in European Manufacturing?," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(1), pages 61-79, February.
    2. Andre Jungmittag, 2004. "Innovations, technological specialisation and economic growth in the EU," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 247-273, January.
    3. Palan, Nicole & Schmiedeberg, Claudia, 2010. "Structural convergence of European countries," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 85-100, May.
    4. Lindegaard, Klaus & Vargas, Leiner, 2003. "Are Central American export specialization patterns "sticky"?," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
    5. Andre Jungmittag & Hariolf Grupp & Angela Hullmann, 1998. "Changing Patterns of Specialisation in Global High Technology Markets: an Empirical Investigation of Advanced Countries," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 67(2), pages 86-98.
    6. Polt, Wolfgang & Berger, Martin & Boekholt, Patries & Cremers, Katrin & Egeln, Jürgen & Gassler, Helmut & Hofer, Reinhold & Rammer, Christian & Deuten, Jasper & Good, Barbara & Warta, Katharina, 2010. "Das deutsche Forschungs- und Innovationssystem: Ein internationaler Sytemvergleich zur Rolle von Wissenschaft, Interaktionen und Governance für die technologische Leistungsfähigkeit," Studien zum deutschen Innovationssystem 11-2010, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin.
    7. repec:got:cegedp:75 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Dora Borbély, 2004. "Competition among Cohesion and Accession Countries: Comparative Analysis of Specialization Within the EU Market," EIIW Discussion paper disbei122, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Specialisation; International Trade Patterns; Growth and Trade;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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