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The economic impact of subsidy phase out in oil exporting developing countries: a case study of Algeria, Iran and Nigeria

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  • Birol, F
  • Aleagha, AV
  • Ferroukhi, R

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  • Birol, F & Aleagha, AV & Ferroukhi, R, 1995. "The economic impact of subsidy phase out in oil exporting developing countries: a case study of Algeria, Iran and Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 209-215, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:23:y:1995:i:3:p:209-215
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Schipper, Lee & Meyers, Stephen, 1991. "Improving appliance efficiency in Indonesia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 578-588.
    2. Bates, Robin W. & Moore, Edwin A., 1992. "Commercial energy efficiency and the environment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 972, The World Bank.
    3. Ibrahim, Ibrahim B. & Hurst, Christopher, 1990. "Estimating energy and oil demand functions : A study of thirteen developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 93-102, April.
    4. Kosmo, Mark, 1989. "Commercial energy subsidies in developing countries Opportunity for reform," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 244-253, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Charles E. McLure, Jr., 2013. "Reforming Subsidies for Fossil Fuel Consumption: Killing Several Birds with One Stone," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1312, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    2. Giwa, Adewale & Alabi, Adetunji & Yusuf, Ahmed & Olukan, Tuza, 2017. "A comprehensive review on biomass and solar energy for sustainable energy generation in Nigeria," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 620-641.
    3. Bazilian, Morgan & Onyeji, Ijeoma, 2012. "Fossil fuel subsidy removal and inadequate public power supply: Implications for businesses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-5.
    4. Charles E. McLure, 2014. "Reforming subsidies for fossil fuel consumption: Killing several birds with one stone," Chapters,in: Taxation and Development: The Weakest Link?, chapter 8, pages 238-284 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Acharya, Rajesh H. & Sadath, Anver C., 2017. "Implications of energy subsidy reform in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 453-462.
    6. Djoni Hartono & Tony Irawan & Ahmad Komarulzaman, 2014. "Energy Pricing Policies in Indonesia: A Computable General Equilibrium Model," EcoMod2014 7344, EcoMod.
    7. Nora Yusma Bte Mohamed Yusoff & Hussain Ali Bekhet, 2016. "Impacts of Energy Subsidy Reforms on the Industrial Energy Structures in the Malaysian Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium Approach," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(1), pages 88-97.
    8. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang & Atsagli, Philip, 2016. "Environmental and welfare assessment of fossil-fuels subsidies removal: A computable general equilibrium analysis for Ghana," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 116(P1), pages 1172-1179.
    9. Hossein Mirshojaeian Hosseini & Shinji Kaneko, 2012. "A general equilibrium analysis of the inflationary impact of energy subsidies reform in Iran," IDEC DP2 Series 2-8, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
    10. Al Iriani, Mahmoud A. & Trabelsi, Mohamed, 2016. "The economic impact of phasing out energy consumption subsidies in GCC countries," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 35-49.
    11. Nwachukwu, Maxwell Umunna & Chike, Harold, 2011. "Fuel subsidy in Nigeria: Fact or fallacy," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 2796-2801.
    12. Siddig, Khalid & Aguiar, Angel & Grethe, Harald & Minor, Peter & Walmsley, Terrie, 2014. "Impacts of removing fuel import subsidies in Nigeria on poverty," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 165-178.
    13. Siddig,Khalid & Minor,Peter J. & Grethe,Harald & Aguiar,Angel & Walmsley,Terrie Louise, 2015. "Impacts on poverty of removing fuel import subsidies in Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7376, The World Bank.

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