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Persistence of the effects of providing feedback alongside smart metering devices on household electricity demand

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  • Schleich, Joachim
  • Faure, Corinne
  • Klobasa, Marian

Abstract

Using large-sample high temporal resolution data from a smart metering field trial, we econometrically estimate the effects of providing feedback in addition to smart metering devices. We compare consumption levels and patterns between a pilot group that received feedback in addition to smart metering devices and a control group with only smart metering devices. We investigate, in particular, the persistence of the effects and whether the effects differ between periods of high and low household occupancy, i.e. between morning and evening periods, and between weekdays and weekend days. The findings show that feedback is effective, leading to about 5% electricity consumption reduction that is persistent over an eleven month period. Furthermore, our results show that this reduction affects both low and high occupancy periods, suggesting that feedback is associated with rather permanent changes in habitual behavior and/or investments in energy-efficient technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Schleich, Joachim & Faure, Corinne & Klobasa, Marian, 2017. "Persistence of the effects of providing feedback alongside smart metering devices on household electricity demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 225-233.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:107:y:2017:i:c:p:225-233
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.05.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yash Chawla & Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska, 2019. "Public Awareness and Consumer Acceptance of Smart Meters among Polish Social Media Users," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(14), pages 1-27, July.
    2. Batalla-Bejerano, Joan & Trujillo-Baute, Elisa & Villa-Arrieta, Manuel, 2020. "Smart meters and consumer behaviour: Insights from the empirical literature," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 144(C).
    3. Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska & Katarzyna Byrka, 2019. "Determinants of the Willingness to Energy Monitoring by Residential Consumers: A Case Study in the City of Wroclaw in Poland," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(5), pages 1-20, March.
    4. Meub, Lukas & Runst, Petrik & von der Leyen, Kaja, 2019. "Can APPealing and more informative bills "nudge" individuals into conserving electricity?," ifh Working Papers 18/2019, Volkswirtschaftliches Institut für Mittelstand und Handwerk an der Universität Göttingen (ifh).
    5. Marc Ringel & Roufaida Laidi & Djamel Djenouri, 2019. "Multiple Benefits through Smart Home Energy Management Solutions—A Simulation-Based Case Study of a Single-Family-House in Algeria and Germany," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(8), pages 1-21, April.
    6. Dato, Prudence & Durmaz, Tunç & Pommeret, Aude, 2020. "Smart grids and renewable electricity generation by households," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    7. Meub, Lukas & Runst, Petrik & von der Leyen, Kaja, 2019. "Can APPealing and more informative bills "nudge" individuals into conserving electricity?," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 372, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    8. David Fredericks & Zhong Fan & Sandra Woolley & Ed de Quincey & Mike Streeton, 2020. "A Decade On, How Has the Visibility of Energy Changed? Energy Feedback Perceptions from UK Focus Groups," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(10), pages 1-17, May.
    9. Liddle, Brantley & Loi, Tian Sheng Allan & Owen, Anthony D. & Tao, Jacqueline, 2020. "Evaluating consumption and cost savings from new air-conditioner purchases: The case of Singapore," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 145(C).
    10. Yash Chawla & Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska & Burcu Oralhan, 2020. "Attitudes and Opinions of Social Media Users Towards Smart Meters’ Rollout in Turkey," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(3), pages 1-27, February.
    11. Loureiro, Maria & Labandeira, Xavier, 2019. "Exploring Energy Use in Retail Stores: A Field Experiment," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(S1).
    12. Bastida, Leire & Cohen, Jed J. & Kollmann, Andrea & Moya, Ana & Reichl, Johannes, 2019. "Exploring the role of ICT on household behavioural energy efficiency to mitigate global warming," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 455-462.
    13. Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska & Katarzyna Byrka & Jakub Serek, 2020. "How to Foster the Adoption of Electricity Smart Meters? A Longitudinal Field Study of Residential Consumers," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(18), pages 1-19, September.
    14. Marc Ringel & Roufaida Laidi & Djamel Djenouri, 2019. "Multiple Benefits through Smart Home Energy Management Solutions -- A Simulation-Based Case Study of a Single-Family House in Algeria and Germany," Papers 1904.11496, arXiv.org.
    15. Wen, Lulu & Zhou, Kaile & Yang, Shanlin & Li, Lanlan, 2018. "Compression of smart meter big data: A survey," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 59-69.

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