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Impact of a carbon tax on the Chilean economy: A computable general equilibrium analysis

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  • García Benavente, José Miguel

Abstract

In 2009, the government of Chile announced their official commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas emissions by 20% below a business-as-usual projection by 2020. Due to the fact that an effective way to reduce emissions is to implement a national carbon tax, the goal of this article is to quantify the value of a carbon tax that will allow the achievement of the emission reduction target and to assess its impact on the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • García Benavente, José Miguel, 2016. "Impact of a carbon tax on the Chilean economy: A computable general equilibrium analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 106-127.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:57:y:2016:i:c:p:106-127
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2016.04.014
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    2. O'Ryan, Ra l & Miller, Sebastian & de Miguel, Carlos J., 2003. "A CGE framework to evaluate policy options for reducing air pollution emissions in Chile," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(02), pages 285-309, May.
    3. Wissema, Wiepke & Dellink, Rob, 2007. "AGE analysis of the impact of a carbon energy tax on the Irish economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(4), pages 671-683, March.
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    6. Bohringer, Christoph & Rutherford, Thomas F., 1997. "Carbon Taxes with Exemptions in an Open Economy: A General Equilibrium Analysis of the German Tax Initiative," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 189-203, February.
    7. Breisinger, Clemens & Thomas, Marcelle & Thurlow, James, 2009. "Social accounting matrices and multiplier analysis: An introduction with exercises," Food security in practice technical guide series 5, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Cameron Hepburn, 2006. "Regulation by Prices, Quantities, or Both: A Review of Instrument Choice," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(2), pages 226-247, Summer.
    9. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Go, Delfin S. & Robinson, Sherman & Thierfelder, Karen, 2009. "Tax policy to reduce carbon emissions in south Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4933, The World Bank.
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