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Does intraday technical analysis in the U.S. equity market have value?

  • Marshall, Ben R.
  • Cahan, Rochester H.
  • Cahan, Jared M.
Registered author(s):

    This paper investigates whether intraday technical analysis is profitable in the U.S. equity market. Surveys of market participants indicate that they place more emphasis on technical analysis (and less on fundamental analysis) the shorter the time horizon; however, the technical analysis literature to date has focused on long-term technical trading rules. We find, using two bootstrap methodologies, that none of the 7846 popular technical trading rules we test are profitable after data snooping bias is taken into account. There is no evidence that the market is inefficient over this time horizon.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VFG-4NTBFH3-2/1/7312c7059094ab334a45ee1b7ae8f011
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Empirical Finance.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (March)
    Pages: 199-210

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:empfin:v:15:y:2008:i:2:p:199-210
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jempfin

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