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Can Food Stamps help to reduce Medicare spending on diabetes?

  • Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

Diabetes is rapidly escalating amongst low-income, older adults at great cost to the Medicare program. We use longitudinal survey data from the Health and Retirement Study linked to administrative Medicare records and biomarker data to assess the relationship between Food Stamp receipt and diabetes health outcomes. We find no significant difference in Medicare spending, outpatient utilization, diabetes hospitalizations and blood sugar (HbA1c) levels between recipients and income-eligible non-recipients after controlling for a detailed set of covariates including individual fixed effects and measures of diabetes treatment compliance. As one-third of elderly Food Stamp recipients are currently diabetic, greater coordination between the Food Stamp, Medicare, and Medicaid programs may improve health outcomes for this group.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B73DX-51CVG19-1/2/052145d537e333cd0045ab812b3d9261
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 9 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 1-13

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:9:y:2011:i:1:p:1-13
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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  1. Shapiro, Jesse M., 2005. "Is there a daily discount rate? Evidence from the food stamp nutrition cycle," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2-3), pages 303-325, February.
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  3. Neeraj Kaushal, 2006. "Do food stamps cause obesity? Evidence from immigrant experience," Working Papers 0607, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  4. Hilary W. Hoynes & Diane Schanzenbach, 2007. "Consumption Responses to In-Kind Transfers: Evidence from the Introduction of the Food Stamp Program," NBER Working Papers 13025, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  8. Weimer, Jon P., 1998. "Factors Affecting Nutrient Intake of the Elderly," Agricultural Economics Reports 33917, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  9. Currie, Janet & Cole, Nancy, 1993. "Welfare and Child Health: The Link between AFDC Participation and Birth Weight," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 971-85, September.
  10. Melvin Stephens Jr., 2003. ""3rd of tha Month": Do Social Security Recipients Smooth Consumption Between Checks?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 406-422, March.
  11. Parke E. Wilde & Paul E. McNamara & Christine K. Ranney, 1999. "The Effect of Income and Food Programs on Dietary Quality: A Seemingly Unrelated Regression Analysis with Error Components," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 959-971.
  12. Ver Ploeg, Michele & Ralston, Katherine L., 2008. "Food Stamps and Obesity: What Do We Know?," Economic Information Bulletin 58640, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  13. Levedahl, J. William, 1991. "The Effect of Food Stamps and Income on Household Food Expenditures," Technical Bulletins 157026, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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