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Regional differences in overweight rates: The case of Italian regions

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  • Brunello, Giorgio
  • Labartino, Giovanna

Abstract

Southern regions in Italy are characterized by higher overweight rates than Northern and Central regions. This gap is higher for young males than for females. We fully account for the differences in overweight rates with a relatively parsimonious set of covariates, and show that the key factors accounting for these differences vary substantially by gender. There is a strong association between regional differences in educational attainment, labor market outcomes and overweight rates for females, and a strong association between regional differences in parental and peer BMI, the regional percentage of primary schools with a canteen and overweight rates for males.

Suggested Citation

  • Brunello, Giorgio & Labartino, Giovanna, 2014. "Regional differences in overweight rates: The case of Italian regions," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 20-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:12:y:2014:i:c:p:20-29
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2012.10.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Barone, Adriana & Nese, Annamaria, 2015. "Body Weight and Gender: Academic Choice and Performance," MPRA Paper 68450, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Emanuele Felice & Josep Pujol Andreu & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2016. "GDP and life expectancy in Italy and Spain over the long run: A time-series approach," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(28), pages 813-866, September.

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