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International transmission of the business cycle in a multi-sector model

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  • Ambler, Steve
  • Cardia, Emanuela
  • Zimmermann, Christian

Abstract

Multi-countru models have not been very successful in replicating features of the international transmission of business cycles. Standard models predict cross-country correlations of output and consumption which are respectively too low and loo high. In this paper, we built a multi-country model of business cycle with multiple sectors in order to analyze the role of sectoral shocks in the international transmission of the business cycle.
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Suggested Citation

  • Ambler, Steve & Cardia, Emanuela & Zimmermann, Christian, 2002. "International transmission of the business cycle in a multi-sector model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 273-300, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:46:y:2002:i:2:p:273-300
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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