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Organizing multiple related tasks into jobs: Diversification vs. competition


  • Baranchuk, Nina


Agency models of multiple tasks typically assume independent outcomes. We show that correlation between outcomes can generate both economy and diseconomy of scale through diversification and competition effects. Additionally, the optimal compensation is non-monotone if the correlation is large.

Suggested Citation

  • Baranchuk, Nina, 2008. "Organizing multiple related tasks into jobs: Diversification vs. competition," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 599-603, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:99:y:2008:i:3:p:599-603

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lazear, Edward P & Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "Rank-Order Tournaments as Optimum Labor Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 841-864, October.
    2. Innes, Robert D., 1990. "Limited liability and incentive contracting with ex-ante action choices," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 45-67, October.
    3. Laux, Christian, 2001. "Limited-Liability and Incentive Contracting with Multiple Projects," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 32(3), pages 514-526, Autumn.
    4. Rajesh K. Aggarwal & Andrew A. Samwick, 1999. "Executive Compensation, Strategic Competition, and Relative Performance Evaluation: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(6), pages 1999-2043, December.
    5. Eric Maskin & Yingyi Qian & Chenggang Xu, 2000. "Incentives, Information, and Organizational Form," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(2), pages 359-378.
    6. Dewatripont, Mathias & Jewitt, Ian & Tirole, Jean, 2000. "Multitask agency problems: Focus and task clustering," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(4-6), pages 869-877, May.
    7. Holmstrom, Bengt & Milgrom, Paul, 1987. "Aggregation and Linearity in the Provision of Intertemporal Incentives," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 303-328, March.
    8. Glenn MacDonald & Leslie M. Marx, 2001. "Adverse Specialization," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(4), pages 864-899, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bourjade, Sylvain & Schindele, Ibolya, 2011. "The role of agency costs in financial conglomeration," MPRA Paper 34815, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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