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Compensation in part-time jobs versus full-time jobs What if the job is the same?

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  • Lettau, Michael K.

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  • Lettau, Michael K., 1997. "Compensation in part-time jobs versus full-time jobs What if the job is the same?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 101-106, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:56:y:1997:i:1:p:101-106
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Main, Brian G M, 1988. "Hourly Earnings of Female Part-time versus Full-time Employees," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 56(4), pages 331-344, December.
    2. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    3. Wayne Simpson, 1986. "Analysis of Part-Time Pay in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 19(4), pages 798-807, November.
    4. Hotchkiss, Julie L, 1991. "The Definition of Part-Time Employment: A Switching Regression Model with Unknown Sample Selection," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(4), pages 899-917, November.
    5. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1994. "Policy Transferability and Hysteresis: Daily and Weekly Hours in the BRD and the US," NBER Working Papers 4773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Montgomery, Mark & Cosgrove, James, 1995. "Are Part-Time Women Paid Less? A Model with Firm-Specific Effects," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(1), pages 119-133, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Aaronson & Eric French, 2004. "The Effect of Part-Time Work on Wages: Evidence from the Social Security Rules," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 329-352, April.
    2. Susan N. Houseman, 2001. "Why Employers Use Flexible Staffing Arrangements: Evidence from an Establishment Survey," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 55(1), pages 149-170, October.
    3. Michael D. Giandrea & Kevin E. Cahill & Joseph F. Quinn, Ph.D., 2008. "Self-Employment Transitions among Older American Workers with Career Jobs," Working Papers 418, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    4. Barry T. Hirsch, 2005. "Why Do Part-Time Workers Earn Less? The Role of Worker and Job Skills," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(4), pages 525-551, July.
    5. Hu, Yongjian & Tijdens, Kea, 2003. "Choices for part-time jobs and the impacts on the wage differentials. A comparative study for Great Britain and the Netherlands," IRISS Working Paper Series 2003-05, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    6. Skatun, John Douglas, 1998. "Divide the hours and conquer the surplus: part-time workers and pay," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 235-242, November.
    7. William Even & David Macpherson, 2004. "Do Pensions Impede Phased Retirement?," Labor and Demography 0407001, EconWPA.
    8. Joan Rodgers & Iris Day, 2013. "The Premium for Part-Time Work in Australia," Economics Working Papers wp13-04, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    9. Pedro Cardoso & Bernard M.S. van Praag, 2003. "How Sustainable Are Old-age Pensions in a Shrinking Population with Endogenous Labour Supply?," CESifo Working Paper Series 861, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Maury Gittleman & Kristen Monaco & Nicole Nestoriak, 2017. "The Requirements of Jobs: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey," NBER Chapters,in: Education, Skills, and Technical Change: Implications for Future US GDP Growth National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2001. "Changing Status: Women’s Part-Time Work and Wages in Britain," LoWER Working Papers wp4, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.

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