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Hourly Earnings of Female Part-time versus Full-time Employees

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  • Main, Brian G M

Abstract

Investigations of the earnings gap between males and females in the British labor market have highlighted the role of part-time employment in women's working lives. The vast majority of part-time jobs are held by women and, at sometime in their labor-market experience, most women hold part-time jobs. This paper attempts to determine the extent to which part-time employment lowers the hourly earnings of women. The approach adopted involves decomposing the part-time/full-time wage gap into that part attributable to the characteristics of the employees and that part attributable to the jobs themselves. Allowance is made for the endogeneity of the part-time work decision. Copyright 1988 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester

Suggested Citation

  • Main, Brian G M, 1988. "Hourly Earnings of Female Part-time versus Full-time Employees," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 56(4), pages 331-344, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manch2:v:56:y:1988:i:4:p:331-44
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    Cited by:

    1. Tim Callan, 1991. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Ireland," Papers WP028, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    2. AlisonL. Booth & JanC. vanOurs, 2008. "Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-Time Work Puzzle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 77-99, February.
    3. Alison Booth & Margi Wood, 2004. "Back-to-front Down-under? Part-time/Full-time Wage Differentials in Australia," CEPR Discussion Papers 482, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. Wolf, Elke, 2002. "Lower wage rates for fewer hours? A simultaneous wage-hours model for Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(5), pages 643-663, November.
    5. Wolf, Elke, 1998. "Do hours restrictions matter? A discrete family labor supply model with endogenous wages and hours restrictions," ZEW Discussion Papers 98-44, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    6. Tim Callan & Anne Wren, 1992. "An Economy-Wide Investigation of Sex Differences in Wage Rates," Papers WP034, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    7. Wolf, Elke, 2001. "Comparing the part-time wage gap in Germany and the Netherlands," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-18, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    8. repec:dgr:kubcen:200769 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Alison Booth & Margi Wood, 2006. "Back-to-front Down-under? Estimating the Part-time/Full-time Wage Differential over the Period 2001-2003," CEPR Discussion Papers 525, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    10. Lettau, Michael K., 1997. "Compensation in part-time jobs versus full-time jobs What if the job is the same?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 101-106, September.
    11. repec:tiu:tiucen:200769 is not listed on IDEAS

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