IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecolet/v157y2017icp97-102.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Urbanization, fertility and child education in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Flückiger, Matthias
  • Ludwig, Markus

Abstract

Using individual-level survey data, we show that the urbanization process in today’s Sub-Saharan Africa is associated with the fertility transition and increased investment in child education. This is consistent with the experience of the Western economies during their transition from a (post-)Malthusian towards a modern growth regime. The use of individual-level data allows us to analyze structural rural–urban differences, holding constant age and regional characteristics which are potentially confounding factors in regional- and country-level regressions.

Suggested Citation

  • Flückiger, Matthias & Ludwig, Markus, 2017. "Urbanization, fertility and child education in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 97-102.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:157:y:2017:i:c:p:97-102
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2017.05.024
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176517302021
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alwyn Young, 2013. "Inequality, the Urban-Rural Gap, and Migration," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(4), pages 1727-1785.
    2. Galor, Oded, 2005. "From Stagnation to Growth: Unified Growth Theory," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.),Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 171-293, Elsevier.
    3. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    4. Michael White & Salut Muhidin & Catherine Andrzejewski & Eva Tagoe & Rodney Knight & Holly Reed, 2008. "Urbanization and fertility: An event-history analysis of Coastal Ghana," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(4), pages 803-816, November.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser, 2014. "A World Of Cities: The Causes And Consequences Of Urbanization In Poorer Countries," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(5), pages 1154-1199, October.
    6. Timothy W. Guinnane, 2011. "The Historical Fertility Transition: A Guide for Economists," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 589-614, September.
    7. Castells-Quintana, David, 2017. "Malthus living in a slum: Urban concentration, infrastructure and economic growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 158-173.
    8. Henderson, J. Vernon, 2005. "Urbanization and Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.),Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 24, pages 1543-1591, Elsevier.
    9. Jedwab, Remi & Christiaensen, Luc & Gindelsky, Marina, 2017. "Demography, urbanization and development: Rural push, urban pull and…urban push?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 6-16.
    10. Gary S. Becker, 1960. "An Economic Analysis of Fertility," NBER Chapters, in: Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries, pages 209-240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Beatrice Asenso Barnieh & Li Jia & Massimo Menenti & Jie Zhou & Yelong Zeng, 2020. "Mapping Land Use Land Cover Transitions at Different Spatiotemporal Scales in West Africa," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(20), pages 1-1, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Mortality; Human capital; Structural transition; Urbanization;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:157:y:2017:i:c:p:97-102. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.