IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecolet/v110y2011i1p38-40.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Union membership and employment dynamics: A note

Author

Listed:
  • Dittrich, Marcus
  • Schirwitz, Beate

Abstract

We show that the well-known result that static union models overstate distortions caused by unionism only holds in the special case of firm-level wage setting. With centralized wage setting, however, it rather depends on both the elasticity of labor demand and union's time preference rate whether static models overrate or even underrate unions' distortions.

Suggested Citation

  • Dittrich, Marcus & Schirwitz, Beate, 2011. "Union membership and employment dynamics: A note," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(1), pages 38-40, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:110:y:2011:i:1:p:38-40
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165-1765(10)00324-1
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jones, Stephen R. G., 1987. "Union membership and employment dynamics," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 197-200.
    2. Kidd, David P & Oswald, Andrew J, 1987. "A Dynamic Model of Trade Union Behaviour," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 54(215), pages 355-365, August.
    3. Chang, Juin-jen & Lai, Ching-chong, 1997. "Union membership and employment dynamics with endogenous union density," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 119-125, November.
    4. Carruth, Alan A & Disney, Richard F, 1988. "Where Have Two Million Trade Union Members Gone?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 55(217), pages 1-19, February.
    5. Marcus Dittrich, 2008. "Union wage setting in a dual labour market: the role of centralisation," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 461-470.
    6. McDonald, Ian M & Solow, Robert M, 1981. "Wage Bargaining and Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 896-908, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Elsayyad, May & Konrad, Kai A., 2012. "Fighting multiple tax havens," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 295-305.
    2. Jens Horbach & Markus Janser, 2016. "The role of innovation and agglomeration for employment growth in the environmental sector," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 488-511, August.
    3. Cabo, Francisco & Martín-Román, Ángel L., 2017. "Dynamic collective bargaining. Frictional effects under open-shop industrial relations," MPRA Paper 77562, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Beate Schirwitz, 2013. "Business Fluctuations, Job Flows and Trade Unions - Dynamics in the Economy," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 47.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unions Endogenous membership Bargaining centralization;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:110:y:2011:i:1:p:38-40. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.