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Healthy food, unhealthy food and obesity

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  • Zheng, Xiaoyong
  • Zhen, Chen

Abstract

We examine whether the latent behavioral mechanisms embedded in two "price effects" explanations of the obesity problem are operative. Our findings lend support to the hypothesis that falling food price is one likely cause of the obesity epidemic.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng, Xiaoyong & Zhen, Chen, 2008. "Healthy food, unhealthy food and obesity," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 300-303, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:100:y:2008:i:2:p:300-303
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination," Working Papers 0203, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    2. Arthur Lewbel & Serena Ng, 2005. "Demand Systems with Nonstationary Prices," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 479-494, August.
    3. Christensen, Laurits R & Jorgenson, Dale W & Lau, Lawrence J, 1975. "Transcendental Logarithmic Utility Functions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 367-383, June.
    4. Hanming Fang & Michael Keane & Ahmed Khwaja & Martin Salm & Dan Silverman, 2007. "Testing the Mechanisms of Structural Models: The Case of the Mickey Mantle Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 53-59, May.
    5. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
    6. Senauer, Benjamin & Gemma, Masahiko, 2006. "Reducing Obesity: What Americans Can Learn from the Japanese," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 21(4).
    7. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. L. Pieroni & D. Lanari & L. Salmasi, 2013. "Food prices and overweight patterns in Italy," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(1), pages 133-151, February.
    2. Fernando Antoñanzas & Roberto Rodríguez-Ibeas, 2011. "Healthy vs. unhealthy food: a strategic choice for firms and consumers," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-8, December.
    3. Pieroni, L. & Salmasi, L., 2014. "Fast-food consumption and body weight. Evidence from the UK," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 94-105.

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