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Attitudes towards immigration--Perceived consequences and economic self-interest

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  • Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj
  • Munch, Jakob Roland
  • Schroll, Sanne
  • Skaksen, Jan Rose

Abstract

Using the European Social Survey 2002/3, we develop a new test of whether economic self-interest influences people's attitudes towards immigration, exploiting that people have widely different perceptions of the consequences of immigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj & Munch, Jakob Roland & Schroll, Sanne & Skaksen, Jan Rose, 2008. "Attitudes towards immigration--Perceived consequences and economic self-interest," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 254-257, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:100:y:2008:i:2:p:254-257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2006. "Learning to Love Globalization: Education and Individual Attitudes Toward International Trade," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(02), pages 469-498, April.
    2. Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Who Is Against Immigration? A Cross-Country Investigation of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 510-530, August.
    3. Dustmann Christian & Preston Ian P, 2007. "Racial and Economic Factors in Attitudes to Immigration," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-41, November.
    4. David Card & Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2005. "Understanding attitudes to immigration: The migration and minority module of the first European Social Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0503, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    5. Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj & Roland Munch, Jakob & Schroll, Sanne & Rose Skaksen, Jan, 2006. "Attitudes Towards Immigration: Does Economic Self-Interest Matter?," Working Papers 11-2006, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics.
    6. Kenneth F. Scheve & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2001. "Labor Market Competition And Individual Preferences Over Immigration Policy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 133-145, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2009. "Frequency of contact with foreigners in a homogenous society: perceived consequences of foreigner increases in Japan," MPRA Paper 14646, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Aggeborn, Linuz & Persson, Lovisa, 2017. "Public Finance and Right-Wing Populism," Working Paper Series 1182, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. repec:pra:mprapa:47899 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2016. "I’m Neither Racist nor Xenophobic, but: Dissecting European Attitudes towards a Ban on Muslims’ Immigration," MPRA Paper 79747, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Frequency of contact with foreigners in a homogeneous society: perceived consequences of foreigner increases," MPRA Paper 33852, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2013. "Préjugés et fausses idées sur l’immigration et les immigrés, vecteurs de discrimination en matière d’accès à l’emploi
      [false ideas about immigrants and immigration and discrimination in labor marke
      ," MPRA Paper 47989, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. TOMIURA Eiichi & ITO Banri & MUKUNOKI Hiroshi & WAKASUGI Ryuhei, 2017. "Individual Characteristics, Behavioral Biases, and Attitudes toward Immigration: Evidence from a survey in Japan," Discussion papers 17033, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. Antonio M. Jaime-Castillo & Ildefonso Marqués-Perales & Javier Álvarez-Gálvez, 2016. "The Impact of Social Expenditure on Attitudes Towards Immigration in Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 1089-1108, April.
    9. Cooray, Arusha & Marfouk, Abdeslam & Nazir, Maliha, 2018. "Public Opinion and Immigration: Who Favors Employment Discrimination against Immigrants?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 175, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    10. Bram Lancee & Sergi Pardos-Prado, 2013. "Group Conflict Theory in a Longitudinal Perspective: Analyzing the Dynamic Side of Ethnic Competition," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 106-131, March.

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