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Assessing the causes of anthropogenic methane emissions in comparative perspective, 1990-2005

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  • Jorgenson, Andrew
  • Birkholz, Ryan

Abstract

The authors engage prior research and theoretical orientations to assess some of the known causes of anthropogenic methane emissions in comparative international contexts. Like carbon dioxide emissions, methane emissions are a known contributor to climate change. Results of cross-national fixed effects panel regression analyses indicate that population size, economic development, the production of cereals, cattle, natural gas and oil, and a reliance on food exports all contribute to methane emissions from 1990 to 2005. Most notably, additional findings suggest that the magnitude of the effects of multiple predictors modestly decreased during the period of investigation, while the impact of other predictors remained very stable in magnitude. The authors conclude by considering the substantive implications of the results, the limitations of the study, and outline the next steps in this research agenda.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorgenson, Andrew & Birkholz, Ryan, 2010. "Assessing the causes of anthropogenic methane emissions in comparative perspective, 1990-2005," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2634-2643, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:12:p:2634-2643
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fernández-Amador, Octavio & Francois, Joseph F. & Oberdabernig, Doris A. & Tomberger, Patrick, 2018. "Empirical estimates of the methane–income elasticity," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 137-139.
    2. Andrew K Jorgenson & Brett Clark, 2013. "The Relationship between National-Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Population Size: An Assessment of Regional and Temporal Variation, 1960–2005," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(2), pages 1-8, February.
    3. Octavio Fernández-Amador & Joseph F. Francois & Doris A. Oberdabernig & Patrick Tomberger, 2020. "Economic growth, sectoral structures, and environmental methane footprints," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(13), pages 1460-1475, March.
    4. Kouser, Shahzad & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Impact of Bt cotton on pesticide poisoning in smallholder agriculture: A panel data analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 2105-2113, September.
    5. Fernández-Amador, Octavio & Francois, Joseph & Oberdabernig, Doris & Tomberger, Patrick, 2018. "The methane footprint of nations: Evidence from global panel data," Papers 1102, World Trade Institute.
    6. Abu Hayat Md. Saiful Islam & Joachim Braun & Andrew L. Thorne-Lyman & Akhter U. Ahmed, 2018. "Farm diversification and food and nutrition security in Bangladesh: empirical evidence from nationally representative household panel data," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 701-720, June.
    7. Islam, A.H.M.S., 2018. "Impact of Integrated Aquaculture-agriculture Value Chain Participation on Welfare of Marginalized Indigenous Households in Bangladesh: A Panel Data Analysis," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277412, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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