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Distribution of ecological entitlements: Implications for economic security and population movement

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  • Ruitenbeek, H. Jack

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  • Ruitenbeek, H. Jack, 1996. "Distribution of ecological entitlements: Implications for economic security and population movement," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 49-64, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:17:y:1996:i:1:p:49-64
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. World Commission on Environment and Development,, 1987. "Our Common Future," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780192820808.
    2. Daly, Herman E., 1992. "Allocation, distribution, and scale: towards an economics that is efficient, just, and sustainable," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 185-193, December.
    3. Boyce, James K., 1994. "Inequality as a cause of environmental degradation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 169-178, December.
    4. Ruitenbeek, H. Jack, 1992. "The rainforest supply price: a tool for evaluating rainforest conservation expenditures," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 57-78, July.
    5. Fields, Gary S & Fei, John C H, 1978. "On Inequality Comparisons," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(2), pages 303-316, March.
    6. James Boyce, 1994. "Inequality as a Cause of Environmental Degradation," Published Studies ps1, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    7. Blackwood, D. L. & Lynch, R. G., 1994. "The measurement of inequality and poverty: A policy maker's guide to the literature," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 567-578, April.
    8. Sen, Amartya K, 1976. "Poverty: An Ordinal Approach to Measurement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(2), pages 219-231, March.
    9. Hussain, Athar & Lanjouw, Peter & Stern, Nicholas, 1994. "Income inequalities in China: Evidence from household survey data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(12), pages 1947-1957, December.
    10. Atkinson, Anthony B., 1970. "On the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 244-263, September.
    11. Broad, Robin, 1994. "The poor and the environment: Friends or foes?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 811-822, June.
    12. Johansson,Per-Olov, 1987. "The Economic Theory and Measurement of Environmental Benefits," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521348102, April.
    13. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Druckman, A. & Jackson, T., 2008. "Measuring resource inequalities: The concepts and methodology for an area-based Gini coefficient," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 242-252, April.
    2. Glazyrina, I. & Zabelina, I. & Klevakina, E., 2010. "Economic Development and Environmental Impact Disparities among Russia's Regions," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, issue 7, pages 70-88.
    3. Alexandre BERTHE, 2016. "Inequalities in the access to water and sanitation services in the North and the Nordeste of Brazil: what lessons for social justice?," Cahiers du GREThA 2016-07, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    4. Hongjian Zhou & Jing’ai Wang & Jinhong Wan & Huicong Jia, 2010. "Resilience to natural hazards: a geographic perspective," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 53(1), pages 21-41, April.
    5. World Bank, 2003. "Nigeria Poverty : Environmental Linkages in the Natural Resource Sector - Empirical Evidence from Nigerian Case Studies with Policy Implications and Recommendations," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14612, The World Bank.
    6. Anna Bozza & Domenico Asprone & Francesco Fabbrocino, 2017. "Urban Resilience: A Civil Engineering Perspective," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-17, January.
    7. Sun, Chuanwang & Zhang, Yifan & Peng, Shuijun & Zhang, Wencheng, 2015. "The inequalities of public utility products in China: From the perspective of the Atkinson index," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 751-760.
    8. Haight, Alan Day, 2007. "Diagram for a small planet: The Production and Ecosystem Possibilities Curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 224-232, October.
    9. Bouvier, Rachel, 2014. "Distribution of income and toxic emissions in Maine, United States: Inequality in two dimensions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 39-47.
    10. Katrina Brown & Sandrine Lapuyade, 2001. "A livelihood from the forest: gendered visions of social, economic and environmental change in Southern Cameroon," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(8), pages 1131-1149.
    11. Stymne, Susanna & Jackson, Tim, 2000. "Intra-generational equity and sustainable welfare: a time series analysis for the UK and Sweden," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 219-236, May.
    12. White, Thomas J., 2007. "Sharing resources: The global distribution of the Ecological Footprint," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 402-410, December.

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