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Wealth, Poverty and Sustainable Development

Author

Listed:
  • David Barkin

    (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Xochimilco, Mexico)

Abstract

An analysis of the underlying causes of environment destruction debunks the idea that the poor are the principal cause of environmental degradation in present-day societies. The paper also identifies some of the major areas of economic theory and institutional biases in market economies that generate obstacles to the 'proper' functioning of markets. As a result, even the more advanced prescriptions of modern environmental economics are incapable of explaining the deepening of social and economic polarization and the worsening of the environmental conditions in which poor people must exist. The paper ends with a proposal for overcoming this growing crisis through local participation and action.

Suggested Citation

  • David Barkin, 2005. "Wealth, Poverty and Sustainable Development," Development and Comp Systems 0506003, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0506003
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 54
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0506/0506003.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Patricia Allen & Carolyn Sachs, 1992. "The poverty of sustainability: An analysis of current positions," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 9(4), pages 29-35, September.
    2. Boyce, James K., 1994. "Inequality as a cause of environmental degradation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 169-178, December.
    3. James Boyce, 1994. "Inequality as a Cause of Environmental Degradation," Published Studies ps1, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Amin, Samir, 1992. "Can environmental problems be subject to economic calculations?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 523-530, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Curtis, Fred, 2003. "Eco-localism and sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 83-102, August.
    2. Tim Wise & Eliza Waters, 2001. "Community Control in a Global Economy: Lessons from Mexico's Economic Integration Process," International Trade 0106002, EconWPA.
    3. David Barkin, 2003. "Alleviating Poverty Through Ecotourism: Promises and Reality in the Monarch Butterfly Reserve of Mexico," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 371-382, September.
    4. Barkin, David, 1996. "Macro changes and micro analysis: methodological issues in ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 197-200, December.
    5. Hudson-Rodd, Nancy & Nyunt, Myo, 2001. "Control Of Land And Life In Burma," Tenure Briefs 12817, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Land Tenure Center.
    6. Tim Wise & Eliza Waters, "undated". "01-03 "Community Control in a Global Economy: Lessons from Mexico's Economic Integration Process"," GDAE Working Papers 01-03, GDAE, Tufts University.
    7. Patrick Webb, 2002. "Cultivated Capital: Agriculture, Food Systems and Sustainable Development," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 15, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    political ecology; sustainability; polarization; heterodox economics; development alternatives;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics

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