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Mending the family tree a reconciliation of the linearization and levels schools of AGE modelling

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  • Hertel, Thomas W.
  • Mark Horridge, J.
  • Pearson, K. R.

Abstract

This paper offers a critical comparison between the North American levels school of applied general equilibrium modelling and the Norwegian/Australian school of linearizers. The paper develops both the levels and linearized representations of a neoclassical, multiregion trade model. This development is used to focus attention on similarities and differences between the two schools. The main conclusions are as follows. i) The method used to solve applied general equilibrium models is not really the issue - the solution method used has become short-hand for a host of cultural differences reflecting the orientation of the two groups. ii) Levels or linearized versions of models are equally valid representations. Either representation is a natural starting point for obtaining accurate solutions of the model. iii) Linearized versions ofter aid transparency in explaining the mechanisms at work in a model. iv) In view of recent developments with the GEMPACK software suite, it is no longer necessary for linearizers to settle for solutions containing linearization errors. v) The two schools have a great deal in common and both would benefit from greater cooperation.
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Suggested Citation

  • Hertel, Thomas W. & Mark Horridge, J. & Pearson, K. R., 1992. "Mending the family tree a reconciliation of the linearization and levels schools of AGE modelling," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 385-407, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:9:y:1992:i:4:p:385-407
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    1. Hanoch, Giora, 1975. "Production and Demand Models with Direct or Indirect Implicit Additivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 43(3), pages 395-419, May.
    2. K.R. Pearson, 1991. "Solving Nonlinear Economic Models Accurately Via a Linear Representation," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers ip-55, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    3. Wigle, Randall M, 1991. "The Pagan-Shannon Approximation: Unconditional Systematic Sensitivity in Minutes," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 35-49.
    4. Pearson, K. R., 1988. "Automating the computation of solutions of large economic models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 385-395, October.
    5. Dawkins, Christina & Srinivasan, T.N. & Whalley, John, 2001. "Calibration," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 58, pages 3653-3703 Elsevier.
    6. Harrison, Glenn W. & Jones, Richard & Kimbell, Larry J. & Wigle, Randal, 1993. "How robust is applied general equilibrium analysis?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 99-115, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Y. Qiang, 1999. "CGE Modelling and Australian Economics," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 99-04, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    2. Sadni Jallab, Mustapha & Abdelmalki, Lahsen, 2007. "The Free Trade Agreement Between the United States and Morocco: The Importance of a Gradual and Assymetric Agreement," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 22, pages 852-887.
    3. Yu, Wusheng & Hertel, Thomas W. & Preckel, Paul V. & Eales, James S., 2004. "Projecting world food demand using alternative demand systems," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 99-129, January.
    4. Elbehri, Aziz & Hertel, Thomas, 2006. "A Comparative Analysis of the EU-Morocco FTA vs. Multilateral Liberalization," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 21, pages 496-525.
    5. George Verikios, 2006. "Understanding the World Wool Market: Trade, Productivity and Grower Incomes. Part 3: A Model of the World Wool Market," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 06-21, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    6. Horridge, Mark & Meeraus, Alex & Pearson, Ken & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2013. "Solution Software for Computable General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    7. Kym Anderson & David Norman & Glyn Wittwer, 2003. "Globalisation of the World's Wine Markets," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(5), pages 659-687, May.
    8. George Verikios, 2006. "Understanding the World Wool Market: Trade, Productivity and Grower Incomes. Part 2: The Toolbox," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 06-20, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    9. Gomes Pereira, Matheus Wemerson & Teixeira, Erly Cardoso & Raszap-Skorbiansky, Sharon, 2010. "Impacts of the Doha Round on Brazilian, Chinese and Indian agribusiness," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 256-271, June.
    10. Durand-Morat, Alvaro & Wailes, Eric J., 2010. "Riceflow: a Multi-region, Multi-product, Spatial Partial Equilibrium Model of the World Rice Economy," Staff Papers 92010, University of Arkansas, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.
    11. Harrison, W Jill & Pearson, K. R. & Powell, Alan A. & Small, John E., 1994. "Solving Applied General Equilibrium Models Represented as a Mixture of Linearized and Levels Equations," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 7(3), pages 203-223.
    12. Wittwer, Glyn & Berger, Nick & Anderson, Kym, 2003. "A model of the world's wine markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 487-506, May.
    13. teixeira, Erly Cardoso, 1998. "Impact of the Uruguay Round Agreement and Mercosul on the Brazilian Economy," Revista Brasileira de Economia - RBE, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 52(3), July.
    14. Joaquim Bento de Souza Ferreira Filho & Carliton Vieira dos Santos & Sandra Maria do Prado Lima, 2007. "Tax Reform, Income Distribution and Poverty in Brazil: an Applied General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers MPIA 2007-26, PEP-MPIA.
    15. Harrison, W Jill & Pearson, K R, 1996. "Computing Solutions for Large General Equilibrium Models Using GEMPACK," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 83-127, May.
    16. Antonio Gómez Gómez-Plana, "undated". "Simulación De Políticas Económicas: Los Modelos De Equilibrio General Aplicado," Working Papers 35-02 Classification-JEL , Instituto de Estudios Fiscales.
    17. K.R. Pearson, 1991. "Solving Nonlinear Economic Models Accurately Via a Linear Representation," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers ip-55, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    18. Lanclos, D. Kent & Hertel, Thomas W. & Devadoss, Stephen, 1996. "Assessing the effects of tariff reform on U.S. food manufacturing industries: the role of imperfect competition and intermediate inputs," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 14(3), pages 201-212, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • O49 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Other

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