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When to make proprietary software open source

Author

Listed:
  • Caulkins, Jonathan P.
  • Feichtinger, Gustav
  • Grass, Dieter
  • Hartl, Richard F.
  • Kort, Peter M.
  • Seidl, Andrea

Abstract

Software can be distributed closed source (proprietary) or open source (developed collaboratively). While a firm cannot sell open source software, and so loses potential sales revenue, the open source software development process can have a substantial positive impact on the quality of a software, its diffusion, and, consequently, the demand for a complementary product from which the firm does profit. Previous papers have considered the firm's option to release software under a closed or open source license as a simple once and for all binary choice. We extend this research by allowing for the possibility of keeping software proprietary for some optimally determined finite time period before making it open source. Furthermore, we study the impact of switching costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Caulkins, Jonathan P. & Feichtinger, Gustav & Grass, Dieter & Hartl, Richard F. & Kort, Peter M. & Seidl, Andrea, 2013. "When to make proprietary software open source," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1182-1194.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:37:y:2013:i:6:p:1182-1194
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2013.02.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hasnas, Irina & Lambertini, Luca & Palestini, Arsen, 2014. "Open Innovation in a dynamic Cournot duopoly," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 79-87.
    2. repec:eee:eecrev:v:94:y:2017:i:c:p:221-239 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:dyncon:v:100:y:2019:i:c:p:353-368 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:ejores:v:267:y:2018:i:2:p:700-715 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Elke Moser & Andrea Seidl & Gustav Feichtinger, 2014. "History-dependence in production-pollution-trade-off models: a multi-stage approach," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 222(1), pages 457-481, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Open source; Optimal control; Multi-stage modeling; Complementary product; Software;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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