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Inflation, volatile public spending, and endogenously sustained growth

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  • Varvarigos, Dimitrios

Abstract

I construct a model of an economy whose government finances volatile public spending via money creation. The model jointly accounts for the emergence of some well-known empirical observations. Specifically, it predicts a negative correlation between output growth and policy volatility. Furthermore, given that both the mean and the variance of the inflation rate are elevated by fluctuations in public spending, the model provides a novel theoretical justification for the simultaneous negative correlation of long-run growth with both average inflation and inflation variability. The model also supports the view that policy volatility reduces social welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Varvarigos, Dimitrios, 2010. "Inflation, volatile public spending, and endogenously sustained growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1893-1906, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:34:y:2010:i:10:p:1893-1906
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dimitrios Varvarigos & Nikolaos Kontogiannis, 2017. "Entrepreneurial Status, Social Norms, and Economic Growth," Discussion Papers in Economics 17/05, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

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