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A Multi-Level Housing Hedonic Analysis of Water and Sanitation Access

Author

Listed:
  • Johanna Choumert

    () (Economic Development Initiatives (E.D.I.))

  • N. Eric Kéré

    () (African Development Bank)

  • Amandine Loyal Laré-Dondarini

    () (Centre d''Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International (CERDI-CNRS))

Abstract

Poor access to safe water and sanitation remains one of the most important development issues in Sub-Saharan African countries, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Development practitioners often cite the paradox of some projects where the improvement of the living conditions of populations –such as water and sanitation access– leads to increased housing prices, forcing the eviction of the poorest. In this context, the purpose of the present study is to examine, in the context of an African city, the impact of housing characteristics on housing values using the hedonic price method with a focus on water and sanitation. Using primary data collected in Togo, we show that households pay a premium for these essential amenities. Such results call for further analysis in African countries to investigate the impact of basic infrastructures on populations through housing markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Johanna Choumert & N. Eric Kéré & Amandine Loyal Laré-Dondarini, 2016. "A Multi-Level Housing Hedonic Analysis of Water and Sanitation Access," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(2), pages 1010-1037.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-16-00059
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; hedonic price; multi-level model; variance components model; water; sanitation;

    JEL classification:

    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General

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