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Inherited social capital and residential mobility: A study using Japan panel data

Author

Listed:
  • Eiji Yamamura

    () (Seinan Gakuin University)

Abstract

Empirical results based on individual-level data from Japan were studied to determine the effect of social capital on the willingness to leave one's residential area. It was found that social capital accumulated through one's own experience in a residential area is not the only factor that reduces willingness to leave. Social capital inherited from one's parents also negatively influences the desire to move.

Suggested Citation

  • Eiji Yamamura, 2017. "Inherited social capital and residential mobility: A study using Japan panel data," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 579-558.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-14-00771
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David, Quentin & Janiak, Alexandre & Wasmer, Etienne, 2010. "Local social capital and geographical mobility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 191-204, September.
    2. Been, Vicki & Ellen, Ingrid Gould & Schwartz, Amy Ellen & Stiefel, Leanna & Weinstein, Meryle, 2011. "Does losing your home mean losing your school?: Effects of foreclosures on the school mobility of children," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 407-414, July.
    3. Compton, Janice & Pollak, Robert A., 2014. "Family proximity, childcare, and women’s labor force attachment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 72-90.
    4. Yann Algan & Pierre Cahuc, 2010. "Inherited Trust and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2060-2092, December.
    5. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqildh09h482kc28p is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Alan Barrett & Irene Mosca, 2013. "The psychic costs of migration: evidence from Irish return migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 483-506, April.
    7. Kan, Kamhon, 2007. "Residential mobility and social capital," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 436-457, May.
    8. Mette Deding & Trine Filges, 2010. "Geographical Mobility Of Danish Dual-Earner Couples-The Relationship Between Change Of Job And Change Of Residence," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 615-634.
    9. Michèle Belot & John Ermisch, 2009. "Friendship ties and geographical mobility: evidence from Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 172(2), pages 427-442.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    social capital; residential mobility.;

    JEL classification:

    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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