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International Capital Mobility in African Countries: Do the legal origins matter?

  • Chrysost Bangaké


    (LEO, University of Orléans (France))

  • Jude Eggoh


    (LEO, University of Orléans (France))

This paper investigates the Feldstein-Horioka coefficients and legal origins for 37 African countries using the recently developed panel cointegration techniques. The empirical findings reported in the paper reveal that savings and investment are nonstationary and cointegrated series. The estimated coefficients using DOLS is 0.58 for the sample as a whole for the period 1970-2006. However, there are marked differences in retentions ratios in each country group with ratio lowest in common law countries (0.34) compared to French civil law countries (0.85). These results imply that in the countries with strong legal protections of investors, capital tends to be mobile internationally than in countries with worse protection.

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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 30 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 73-83

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00724
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  1. Andrei Shleifer & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Rafael La Porta, 2008. "The Economic Consequences of Legal Origins," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(2), pages 285-332, June.
  2. Stock, James H & Watson, Mark W, 1993. "A Simple Estimator of Cointegrating Vectors in Higher Order Integrated Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(4), pages 783-820, July.
  3. Valérie Mignon & Christophe Hurlin, 2005. "Une synthèse des tests de racine unitaire sur données de panel," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 169(3), pages 253-294.
  4. Jerry Coakley & Ana-Maria Fuertes & Fabio Spagnolo, 2004. "The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle is not as bad as you think," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2003 17, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
  5. Christophe Hurlin & V. Mignon, 2005. "Une Synthèse des Tests de Racine Unitaire en sur Données de Panel," Post-Print halshs-00257324, HAL.
  6. Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1999. "Why Has Africa Grown Slowly?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 3-22, Summer.
  7. Martin Feldstein & Charles Horioka, 1979. "Domestic Savings and International Capital Flows," NBER Working Papers 0310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Pedroni, Peter, 1999. " Critical Values for Cointegration Tests in Heterogeneous Panels with Multiple Regressors," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 653-70, Special I.
  9. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
  10. Albert H. De Wet & Reneé Van Eyden, 2005. "Capital Mobility In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Panel Data Approach," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 73(1), pages 22-35, 03.
  11. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1998. "Law and Finance," Scholarly Articles 3451310, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:11:y:2003:i:1:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Banerjee, Anindya, 1999. " Panel Data Unit Roots and Cointegration: An Overview," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 607-29, Special I.
  14. Sinha, Tapen & Sinha, Dipendra, 2004. "The mother of all puzzles would not go away," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 259-267, February.
  15. James Payne & Risa Kumazawa, 2005. "Capital mobility, foreign aid, and openness: further panel data evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 122-126, March.
  16. Hiroshi Gunji, 2003. "The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle and law," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 11(1), pages 1-12.
  17. Maddala, G S & Wu, Shaowen, 1999. " A Comparative Study of Unit Root Tests with Panel Data and a New Simple Test," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 631-52, Special I.
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