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Inflationary Expectations In Ethiopia: Some Preliminary Results

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  • LOENING, Josef

    ()

  • TAKADA, Hideki

    ()

Abstract

We analyze short-run dynamics of inflation in Ethiopia, using a parsimonious error-correction model fitted with monthly observations. Our findings show that increased money supply and the nominal exchange rate significantly affect inflation in the short-run. Agricultural output shocks, proxied by a cereal-weighted agricultural production index, are also important. By providing an accommodative financial environment, our findings suggest that monetary policy in Ethiopia triggers price inertia, which has large and persistent effects. A simulation suggests that monetary policy alone may be unfeasible to control inflation effectively. To circumvent an extreme tightening with discouraging impacts on growth, additional measures are needed. These should improve the transparency and credibility of monetary policy, and reduce structural barriers that affect price formation and market efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • LOENING, Josef & TAKADA, Hideki, 2008. "Inflationary Expectations In Ethiopia: Some Preliminary Results," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 8(2), pages 159-176.
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:8:y:2008:i:2_13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Almeida, Heitor & Bonomo, Marco, 2002. "Optimal state-dependent rules, credibility, and inflation inertia," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(7), pages 1317-1336, October.
    2. Mame Astou Diouf, 2007. "Modeling Inflation for Mali," IMF Working Papers 07/295, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Batini, Nicoletta & Nelson, Edward, 2001. "The Lag from Monetary Policy Actions to Inflation: Friedman Revisited," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 381-400, Winter.
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    5. Ball, Laurence, 1992. "Why does high inflation raise inflation uncertainty?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 371-388, June.
    6. Durevall, Dick & Ndung'u, Njuguna S., 1998. "A Dynamic Model of Inflation for Kenya 1974 - 1996," Working Papers in Economics 7, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    7. Alexis Anagnostopoulos & Omar Licandro & Italo Bove & Karl Schlag, 2007. "An Evolutionary Theory of Inflation Inertia," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(2-3), pages 433-443, 04-05.
    8. Dexter, Albert S. & Levi, Maurice D. & Nault, Barrie R., 2002. "Sticky prices: the impact of regulation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 797-821, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aron, Janine & Muellbauer, John & Sebudde, Rachel, 2015. "Inflation forecasting models for Uganda: is mobile money relevant?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10739, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ethiopia; Error-correction Model; Inflation; Inertia.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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