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Kinderbetreuung, Fertilität und Frauenerwerbstätigkeit

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  • Rainald Borck

Abstract

This paper studies the relation between childcare, fertility and female labour force participation. It presents a simple model which analyses whether qualitatively better or cheaper (subsidised) childcare increases fertility and female labour force participation. It then describes empirical studies that analyse these relationships either with aggregate data or with micro-data. Finally, some policy conclusions are discussed. Dieser Beitrag untersucht den Zusammenhang zwischen Kinderbetreuung, Fertilität und Frauenerwerbstätigkeit. Zunächst wird ein theoretisches Modell vorgestellt, das untersucht, ob eine qualitativ bessere oder billigere (subventionierte) Kinderbetreuung die Fertilität oder das Arbeitsangebot von Frauen erhöht. Danach werden empirische Studien vorgestellt, die diese Zusammenhänge mit aggregierten Daten oder Individualdaten empirisch testen. Am Schluss werden einige Politikimplikationen diskutiert.

Suggested Citation

  • Rainald Borck, 2010. "Kinderbetreuung, Fertilität und Frauenerwerbstätigkeit," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 79(3), pages 169-180.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwvjh:79-3-11
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    File URL: http://ejournals.duncker-humblot.de/DH/doi/pdf/10.3790/vjh.79.3.169
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alexander Bick, 2010. "The Quantitative Role of Child Care for Fertility and Female Labor Force Participation," 2010 Meeting Papers 892, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Mörk, Eva & Sjögren, Anna & Svalelryd, Helena, 2008. "Cheaper child care, more children," Working Paper Series 2008:29, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Jonah B. Gelbach, 2002. "Public Schooling for Young Children and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 307-322, March.
    4. Daniela Del Boca, 2002. "The effect of child care and part time opportunities on participation and fertility decisions in Italy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 549-573.
    5. Pedro Mira & Namkee Ahn, 2002. "A note on the changing relationship between fertility and female employment rates in developed countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(4), pages 667-682.
    6. Alessandra Fogli & Raquel Fernandez, 2009. "Culture: An Empirical Investigation of Beliefs, Work, and Fertility," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 146-177, January.
    7. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan, 2008. "Child-Care Policy and the Labor Supply of Mothers with Young Children: A Natural Experiment from Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(3), pages 519-548, July.
    8. Nicole M Fortin, 2005. "Gender Role Attitudes and the Labour-market Outcomes of Women across OECD Countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 416-438, Autumn.
    9. Florence Jaumotte, 2004. "Labour Force Participation of Women: Empirical Evidence on The Role of Policy and Other Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2003(2), pages 51-108.
    10. Lundin, Daniela & Mörk, Eva & Öckert, Björn, 2008. "How far can reduced childcare prices push female labour supply?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 647-659, August.
    11. Elizabeth U. Cascio, 2009. "Maternal Labor Supply and the Introduction of Kindergartens into American Public Schools," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Childcare; fertility; female labour supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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