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Loss aversion and duration of residence

Author

Listed:
  • Philip S. Morrison

    (Victoria University of Wellington)

  • William A.V. Clark

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip S. Morrison & William A.V. Clark, 2016. "Loss aversion and duration of residence," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(36), pages 1079-1100, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:35:y:2016:i:36
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol35/36/35-36.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carter, Steven & McBride, Michael, 2013. "Experienced utility versus decision utility: Putting the ‘S’ in satisfaction," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 13-23.
    2. Goodman, Allen C., 2002. "Estimating Equilibrium Housing Demand for "Stayers"," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 1-24, January.
    3. Peter Morrison, 1967. "Duration of Residence and Prospective Migration: The Evaluation of a Stochastic Model," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 4(2), pages 553-561, June.
    4. Chan, Sewin, 2001. "Spatial Lock-in: Do Falling House Prices Constrain Residential Mobility?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 567-586, May.
    5. Audrey Light & Taehyun Ahn, 2010. "Divorce as risky behavior," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(4), pages 895-921, November.
    6. Beata Nowok & Maarten van Ham & Allan M Findlay & Vernon Gayle, 2013. "Does Migration Make You Happy? A Longitudinal Study of Internal Migration and Subjective Well-Being," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 45(4), pages 986-1002, April.
    7. David Genesove & Christopher Mayer, 2001. "Loss Aversion and Seller Behavior: Evidence from the Housing Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1233-1260.
    8. Bauernschuster, Stefan & Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Suedekum, Jens & Lameli, Alfred, 2014. "Why are educated and risk-loving persons more mobile across regions?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 56-69.
    9. S. Dellavigna., 2011. "Psychology and Economics: Evidence from the Field," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 5.
    10. Axel Heitmueller, 2005. "Unemployment benefits, risk aversion, and migration incentives," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 93-112, January.
    11. Lucie Schmidt, 2008. "Risk preferences and the timing of marriage and childbearing," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(2), pages 439-460, May.
    12. Hey, John D & McKenna, Chris J, 1979. "To Move or Not to Move?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 46(182), pages 175-185, May.
    13. Bruce Headey, 1993. "An economic model of subjective well-being: Integrating economic and psychological theories," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 97-116, February.
    14. Daveri, Francesco & Faini, Riccardo, 1999. "Where Do Migrants Go?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(4), pages 595-622, October.
    15. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
    16. J O Huff & W A V Clark, 1978. "Cumulative stress and cumulative inertia: a behavioral model of the decision to move," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 10(10), pages 1101-1119, October.
    17. Hill Kulu & Fiona Steele, 2013. "Interrelationships Between Childbearing and Housing Transitions in the Family Life Course," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(5), pages 1687-1714, October.
    18. Kan, Kamhon, 1999. "Expected and Unexpected Residential Mobility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 72-96, January.
    19. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    20. Carola de Groot & Clara H Mulder & Marjolijn Das & Dorien Manting, 2011. "Life Events and the Gap between Intention to Move and Actual Mobility," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 43(1), pages 48-66, January.
    21. J O Huff & W A V Clark, 1978. "Cumulative Stress and Cumulative Inertia: A Behavioral Model of the Decision to Move," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 10(10), pages 1101-1119, October.
    22. Carola de Groot & Clara H Mulder & Marjolijn Das & Dorien Manting, 2011. "Life events and the gap between intention to move and actual mobility," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 43(1), pages 48-66, January.
    23. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
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    1. repec:eee:enepol:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:428-440 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    adjustment; endowment effects; internal migration; mobility; prospect theory; rational consumers;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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