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How Do Elementary And Higher Education Affect Human Capital Accumulation And Inequality? A Note

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  • Nakajima, Tetsuya
  • Nakamura, Hideki

Abstract

We clarify the different effects of elementary and higher education on human capital accumulation and inequality. The productivity of elementary education plays a significant role in the widening of inequality regardless of the existence of multiple steady states. When the productivity of elementary education is low, the poor cannot afford higher education in the long run because the demand for education by the rich makes the price of education too high for the poor. However, the effect of its productivity on the attainable education level is ambiguous. A rise in the productivity of higher education always increases the education level.

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  • Nakajima, Tetsuya & Nakamura, Hideki, 2012. "How Do Elementary And Higher Education Affect Human Capital Accumulation And Inequality? A Note," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(01), pages 151-158, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:16:y:2012:i:01:p:151-158_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2004. "From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation: Inequality and the Process of Development," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 1001-1026.
    2. Nakajima, Tetsuya & Nakamura, Hideki, 2009. "The price of education and inequality," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 105(2), pages 183-185, November.
    3. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2006. "Das Human-Kapital: A Theory of the Demise of the Class Structure," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 85-117.
    4. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    5. Jean-Pierre Vidal & Michael Bräuninger, 2000. "Private versus public financing of education and endogenous growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(3), pages 387-401.
    6. Moav, Omer, 2002. "Income distribution and macroeconomics: the persistence of inequality in a convex technology framework," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 187-192, April.
    7. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-834, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nakamura, Hideki, 2015. "Which education policies can prevent the collapse of the middle-income group?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-10.
    2. Hideki Nakamura, 2013. "Wages of regular and irregular workers, the price of education, and income inequality," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(4), pages 517-533, December.
    3. Nakamura, Hideki, 2012. "Why does scholastic achievement differ across prefectures in Japan?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 99-106.

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