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Incentives to retire later a solution to the social security crisis?


Als ein möglicher Ausweg aus der drohenden Finanzkrise umlagefinanzierter Rentensysteme wird gegenwärtig eine Anhebung des Rentenzugangsalters von vielen favorisiert. Um allerdings Arbeitnehmern einen Anreiz zur Verlängerung der Lebensarbeitszeit zu geben, muss nach Auffassung der meisten Experten die Beziehung zwischen Beiträgen und Rentenansprüchen gestärkt werden. In dieser Arbeit werden die langfristigen finanziellen Konsequenzen einer solchen Reform analysiert. Wir zeigen, dass bei versicherungsmathematischen Zuschlägen für Mehrarbeit der Beitragssatz langfristig eine steigende Funktion des tatsächlich gewählten Rentenalters ist. Darüber hinaus steigt auch die implizite Steuer, die ein repräsentativer Versicherter an die Rentenkasse zahlt, sofern das Rentenalter in Folge einer ,,steilen" Zuschlagsfunktion zunimmt. In diesem Sinne k¨onnte die vorgeschlagene ,,Behandlung" die diagnostizierte ,,Krankheit" verschlimmern. Abschließend zeigen wir, wie der negative Effekt durch Aufbau eines Kapitalstocks vermieden werden kann. As one possible solution to the well-known financing crisis of unfunded social security systems, an increase in the retirement age is a popular option. To induce workers to retire later, it has been proposed to strengthen the link between retirement age and benefit level. The present paper is devoted to analyzing the long-run financial implications of such a reform. We show that with actuarial adjustments the long-run contribution rate is an increasing function of the retirement age chosen by workers. Moreover, the implicit tax paid to the pension system by a participant can increase in the long run if the retirement age rises in response to a "steep" adjustment rule. In this sense, the proposed "cure" may worsen the disease. Finally, we propose an alternative adjustment scheme which avoids these negative consequences. Finally, we show how the negative effects can be avoided by forming a capital stock from the

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Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Journal of Pension Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 1 (2002)
Issue (Month): 02 (July)
Pages: 111-130

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:1:y:2002:i:02:p:111-130_00
Contact details of provider: Postal: Cambridge University Press, UPH, Shaftesbury Road, Cambridge CB2 8BS UK
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  1. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kapteyn, Arie & de Vos, Klaas, 1998. "Social Security and Labor-Force Participation in the Netherlands," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 164-67, May.
  3. Martin Feldstein & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 2001. "Social Security," NBER Working Papers 8451, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    • Feldstein, Martin & Liebman, Jeffrey B., 2002. "Social security," Handbook of Public Economics, in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 32, pages 2245-2324 Elsevier.
  4. Borsch-Supan, Axel & Schnabel, Reinhold, 1998. "Social Security and Declining Labor-Force Participation in Germany," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 173-78, May.
  5. Hassler, John & Lindbeck, Assar, 1997. "Optimal Actuarial Fairness in Pension Systems - a Note," Seminar Papers 609, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  6. Breyer, Friedrich, 2001. "Why Funding is not a Solution to the "Social Security Crisis"," IZA Discussion Papers 328, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Blundell, Richard & Johnson, Paul, 1998. "Pensions and Labor-Market Participation in the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 168-72, May.
  8. Mathias Kifman & Dirk Schindler, 2000. "Smoothing the Implicit Tax Rate in a Pay-as-you-go Pension System," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 57(3), pages 261-, May.
  9. Gruber, Jonathan & Wise, David, 1998. "Social Security and Retirement: An International Comparison," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 158-63, May.
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