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Social Security and Labor-Force Participation in the Netherlands


  • Kapteyn, Arie
  • de Vos, Klaas


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  • Kapteyn, Arie & de Vos, Klaas, 1998. "Social Security and Labor-Force Participation in the Netherlands," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 164-167, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:88:y:1998:i:2:p:164-67

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Walliser, Jan, 2000. " Adverse Selection in the Annuities Market and the Impact of Privatizing Social Security," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(3), pages 373-393, June.
    2. Martin Feldstein & Andrew Samwick, 1998. "The Transition Path in Privatizing Social Security," NBER Chapters,in: Privatizing Social Security, pages 215-264 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Feldstein, Martin & Liebman, Jeffrey B., 2002. "Social security," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 32, pages 2245-2324 Elsevier.
    4. Henning Bohn, 1997. "Social Security reform and financial markets," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 41(Jun), pages 193-227.
    5. Smetters, Kent & Walliser, Jan, 2004. "Opting out of social security," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1295-1306, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kapteyn, Arie & Alessie, Rob & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2005. "Explaining the wealth holdings of different cohorts: Productivity growth and Social Security," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 1361-1391, July.
    2. Korthals Roxanne, 2012. "Selection and tracking in secondary education: A cross country analysis of student performance and educational opportunities," ROA Research Memorandum 014, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    3. Breyer, Friedrich & Kifmann, Mathias, 2002. "Incentives to retire later a solution to the social security crisis?," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 111-130, July.
    4. van Sonsbeek, J.M. & Gradus, R.H.J.M., 2006. "A microsimulation analysis of the 2006 regime change in the Dutch disability scheme," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 427-456, May.
    5. Beetsma, Roel & Bettendorf, Leon & Broer, Peter, 2003. "The budgeting and economic consequences of ageing in the Netherlands," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 987-1013, September.
    6. Hans G. Bloemen, 2016. "Private wealth and job exit at older age: a random effects model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 763-807, September.
    7. van Sonsbeek, Jan-Maarten & Alblas, Ridwan, 2012. "Disability benefit microsimulation models in the Netherlands," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 700-715.
    8. Bloemen, Hans, 2006. "The Impact of Wealth on Job Exit Rates of Elderly Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 2247, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Montizaan, Raymond M. & Vendrik, Maarten C.M., 2014. "Misery Loves Company: Exogenous shocks in retirement expectations and social comparison effects on subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 1-26.
    10. Riccardo Magnani, 2016. "Is an Increase in the Minimum Retirement Age Always Desirable? The Case of Notional Defined Contribution Systems," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(3), pages 578-602, July.
    11. Tunga Kantarci & Arthur Soest, 2008. "Gradual Retirement: Preferences and Limitations," De Economist, Springer, vol. 156(2), pages 113-144, June.
    12. Alessie, Rob & Kapteyn, Arie, 2001. "Savings and pensions in The Netherlands," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 61-82, March.
    13. David Black & Yi-Ping Tseng & Roger Wilkins, 2009. "Examining the Role of Demographic Change in the Decline in Male Employment in Australia: A Propensity Score Re-weighting Decomposition Approach," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    14. Riccardo Magnani, 2016. "Is an Increase in the Minimum Retirement Age Always Desirable? The Case of Notional Defined Contribution Systems," Post-Print hal-01362459, HAL.

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