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Debt Contracts with Financial Intermediation with Costly Screening

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  • Cheng Wang
  • Stephen D. Williamson

Abstract

The authors develop a credit market model with adverse selection where risk-neutral borrowers self select because lenders make use of a costly screening technology. Equilibrium contracts are debt contracts, and this is robust to randomization, in contrast to results for the costly state verification model. This framework permits optimal financial intermediary structures, in that there is delegated screening in equilibrium if many borrowers are required to fund individual investment projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Cheng Wang & Stephen D. Williamson, 1998. "Debt Contracts with Financial Intermediation with Costly Screening," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 573-595, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:31:y:1998:i:3:p:573-595
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Keith Blackburn & Niloy Bose & Salvatore Capasso, 2005. "Financial Development, Financing Choice and Economic Growth," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 135-149, May.
    2. Gangopadhyay, Shubhashis & Mukhopadhyay, Bappaditya, 2002. "Multiple bank lending and seniority in claims," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 7-30.
    3. A. Fedele & A. Mantovani & F. Liucci, 2010. "Credit availability in the crisis: which role for the European Investment Bank Group?," Working Papers 699, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    4. Bose, Arup & Pal, Debashis & Sappington, David E.M., 2012. "Extreme screening policies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1607-1620.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Lacker, 2001. "Collateralized Debt as the Optimal Contract," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(4), pages 842-859, October.
    2. Stephen D. Williamson, 1998. "Discount Window Lending and Deposit Insurance," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(1), pages 246-275, January.
    3. Anthony Yezer & Pingkang Yu, 2016. "Costly Screening, Self-Selection, Fraud, and the Organization of Credit Markets," Working Papers 2016-4, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    4. A. Fedele & A. Mantovani & F. Liucci, 2010. "Credit availability in the crisis: which role for the European Investment Bank Group?," Working Papers 699, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. Hyytinen, Ari & Toivanen, Otto, 2000. "Monitoring and market power in loan markets," Research Discussion Papers 9/2000, Bank of Finland.
    6. Bose, Arup & Pal, Debashis & Sappington, David E.M., 2012. "Extreme screening policies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1607-1620.
    7. Hyytinen, Ari, 2001. "Information Production, Banking Competition and the Market Structure of the Banking Industry," Discussion Papers 749, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    8. WaiHong Ho & Yong Wang, 2013. "Asymmetric Information, Auditing Commitment, and Economic Growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(2), pages 611-633, May.
    9. Bernhardt Dan, 2012. "Screening and Financial Contracting in the Face of Outside Competition," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-40, May.
    10. Hyytinen, Ari & Toivanen, Otto, 2004. "Monitoring and market power in credit markets," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 269-288, February.
    11. Gangopadhyay, Shubhashis & Mukhopadhyay, Bappaditya, 2002. "Multiple bank lending and seniority in claims," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 7-30.
    12. Bossone, Biagio, 2000. "What makes banks special ? a study of banking, finance, and economic development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2408, The World Bank.

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