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Brain Gain: Wohin gehen die Wissensträger in Zukunft?

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  • Straubhaar Thomas

Abstract

The positive impact of human capital on economic growth has become an almost iron law of economics. The basic argument is that economies with more human capital grow faster and allow people to reach a higher per capita income. The transfer of this theoretically well developed argument into politics leads to a strong influence of public action in the human capital accumulation process.

Suggested Citation

  • Straubhaar Thomas, 1999. "Brain Gain: Wohin gehen die Wissensträger in Zukunft?," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 50(1), pages 233-258, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:ordojb:v:50:y:1999:i:1:p:233-258:n:17
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    References listed on IDEAS

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