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Property Insecurity and Conflict

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  • Lawson-Remer Terra

    () (The New School, 66W 12th Street, 6th floor, New York, NY, 10011, USA)

Abstract

Insecure property rights for marginalized groups foster anti-government grievances – motivating dispossessed groups to rebel, and increasing the likelihood of armed conflict and civil war. Cross-country research often treats property rights security in a country as homogeneous, but this standard one-dimensional conception of property rights ignores significant variations in the risk of expropriation faced by different groups within the same country. Using a new indicator that measures the property insecurity of marginalized minority groups, this article demonstrates that the severity of property insecurity for the worst-off groups in a country is positively associated with the likelihood of armed conflict across a range of specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Lawson-Remer Terra, 2013. "Property Insecurity and Conflict," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 131-160, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:globdv:v:4:y:2013:i:1:p:131-160:n:2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Macartan Humphreys, 2005. "Natural Resources, Conflict, and Conflict Resolution," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 49(4), pages 508-537, August.
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    5. Harvey, David, 2005. "The New Imperialism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199278084, June.
    6. Michael L. Ross, 2004. "What Do We Know about Natural Resources and Civil War?," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 41(3), pages 337-356, May.
    7. James A Piazza, 2011. "Poverty, Minority Economic Discrimination, and Domestic Terrorism," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 48(3), pages 339-353, May.
    8. Lee J. Alston & Edwyna Harris & Bernardo Mueller, 2009. "De Facto and De Jure Property Rights: Land Settlement and Land Conflict on the Australian, Brazilian and U.S. Frontiers," CEPR Discussion Papers 607, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    9. Edward Miguel & Shanker Satyanath & Ernest Sergenti, 2004. "Economic Shocks and Civil Conflict: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(4), pages 725-753, August.
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