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Backtracking from Globalization

Listed author(s):
  • Hillebrand Evan E

    ()

    (University of Kentucky)

  • Lewer Joshua J.

    ()

    (Bradley University)

  • Zagardo Janice Turtora

    ()

    (Bradley University)

This paper offers a global perspective of the political economy of the liberal trading system since the Great Depression and examines four major intellectual and socio-political challenges facing international trade and globalization going forward, including: (1) income redistribution, (2) the rise of Asia and a potential shift in comparative advantage, (3) the rise of China and the national security argument, and (4) the lack of compelling dynamic evidence supporting free trade. Given the growing domestic and global discontent with free trade, and the fact that these exacerbating issues remain, this paper suggests that U.S. and global trade policies may shift away from the liberal trading system.

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Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Global Economy Journal.

Volume (Year): 10 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (January)
Pages: 1-19

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:glecon:v:10:y:2011:i:4:n:6
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  1. Knack, Stephen & Keefer, Philip, 1995. "Institutions and Economic Performance: Cross-Country Tests Using Alternative Institutional Indicators," MPRA Paper 23118, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Paul Krugman, 1995. "Growing World Trade: Causes and Consequences," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 327-377.
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  17. Howard F. Rosen, 2008. "Strengthening Trade Adjustment Assistance," Policy Briefs PB08-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
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  19. Robert Feenstra & Gordon Hanson, 2001. "Global Production Sharing and Rising Inequality: A Survey of Trade and Wages," NBER Working Papers 8372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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