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The Information Technology Industries: Employees, Wages And Dealing With Shocks

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  • Yoav Friedmann

    () (Bank of Israel)

Abstract

This paper describes and analyzes developments in employment, wages and profitability in the information technology industries between the years 1995 and 2010, and the uniqueness of the human capital among those working in these industries in Israel. Data on bachelor’s degree recipients by profession indicate the large amount of time—more than five years—that passes from the time a positive shock in the industry is observed and demand for workers increases until the end of the period of adjustment between labor supply and demand. The increase in productivity and wages in the information technology industries during the second half of the 1990s led to a sharp increase in the quality of the workforce in these industries, emphasizing the uniqueness of the current aggregate human capital of those working in the information technology industries. Most of the electrical and electronics engineers and those with degrees in computer sciences in the economy are employed in the information technology industries, which are export-intensive industries. It is therefore reasonable to assume that the exchange rate and global demand (which affect the nominal product per employee in these industries) affect their wages. Contrary to the opinion that there is a high return for entrepreneurs in information technology, it seems that the high wages of those working in the industry, combined with the unique human capital, constitute the “buffer” for absorbing negative shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoav Friedmann, 2016. "The Information Technology Industries: Employees, Wages And Dealing With Shocks," Israel Economic Review, Bank of Israel, vol. 14(1), pages 97-132.
  • Handle: RePEc:boi:isrerv:v:14:y:2016:i:1:p:97-132
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Assaf Razin, 2018. "High Tech and Venture Capital Inflows: The case of Israel," NBER Working Papers 25351, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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