IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/boe/qbullt/0104.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Cross-border bank credit and global financial stability

Author

Listed:
  • Hills, Robert

    () (Bank of England)

  • Hoggarth, Glenn

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

This article looks in detail at one aspect of global liquidity: cross-border credit provided by banks. Cross-border banking can potentially have considerable benefits, especially by diversifying the available sources of lending and borrowing, and by increasing banking competition. But such flows can also amplify risks in times of stress. As this article sets out, cross-border bank lending contributed to the build-up in vulnerabilities before the recent crisis, and exacerbated the bust once the crisis hit. The article then considers possible policy responses, arguing in particular that policymakers need to ensure that they can properly monitor these flows, from the point of view of recipient countries and the global system as a whole.

Suggested Citation

  • Hills, Robert & Hoggarth, Glenn, 2013. "Cross-border bank credit and global financial stability," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(2), pages 126-136.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0104
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/quarterly-bulletin/2013/cross-border-bank-credit-and-global-financial-stability.pdf?la=en&hash=29525EF6C62D7855D7A38EBC9E119660322A2B2D
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Astley, Mark & Giese, Julia & Hume, Michael & Kubelec, Chris, 2009. "Global imbalances and the financial crisis," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 49(3), pages 178-190.
    2. Bell, Venetia & Young, Garry, 2010. "Understanding the weakness of bank lending," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(4), pages 311-320.
    3. Bell, Venetia & Butt, Nick & Talbot, James, 2013. "The Bank of England Bank Liabilities Survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(1), pages 68-76.
    4. Joyce, Michael & Tong, Matthew & Woods, Robert, 2011. "The United Kingdom’s quantitative easing policy: design, operation and impact," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(3), pages 200-212.
    5. Churm, Rohan & Radia, Amar & Leake, Jeremy & Srinivasan, Sylaja & Whisker, Rishard, 2012. "The Funding for Lending Scheme," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 306-320.
    6. Claudio Borio & Piti Disyatat, 2011. "Global imbalances and the financial crisis: Link or no link?," BIS Working Papers 346, Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Hyun Song Shin, 2012. "Global Banking Glut and Loan Risk Premium," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 60(2), pages 155-192, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Robert N. McCauley & Patrick McGuire & Vladyslav Sushko, 2015. "Global dollar credit: links to US monetary policy and leverage," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 30(82), pages 187-229.
    2. Punzi, Maria Teresa & Kauko, Karlo, 2015. "Testing the global banking glut hypothesis," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 128-151.
    3. Bogdan Murarasu & Alina Bobasu, 2014. "Output Spillovers from Trade and Financial Linkages in Central and Eastern European Countries: A Panel Analysis," The Review of Finance and Banking, Academia de Studii Economice din Bucuresti, Romania / Facultatea de Finante, Asigurari, Banci si Burse de Valori / Catedra de Finante, vol. 6(2), pages 081-096, December.
    4. Hoggarth, Glen & Jung, Carsten & Reinhardt, Dennis, 2016. "Capital inflows — the good, the bad and the bubbly," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 40, Bank of England.
    5. Tucker, Paul & Hall, Simon & Pattani, Aashish, 2013. "Macroprudential policy at the Bank of England," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(3), pages 192-200.
    6. João Amador & João Falcão Silva, 2017. "Banks international asset portfolios: optimality, linkages and resilience," IFC Bulletins chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Statistical implications of the new financial landscape, volume 43 Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Hoggarth, Glenn & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya, 2013. "Financial Stability Paper No 22: Which way do foreign branches sway? Evidence from the recent UK domestic credit cycle," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 22, Bank of England.
    8. Chowla, Shiv & Quaglietti, Lucia & Rachel, Lukasz, 2014. "How have world shocks affected the UK economy?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 167-179.
    9. Milcheva, Stanimira & Zhu, Bing, 2016. "Bank integration and co-movements across housing markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(S), pages 148-171.
    10. Torsten Ehlers & Patrick McGuire, 2017. "Foreign banks and credit conditions in EMEs," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Financial systems and the real economy, volume 91, pages 101-123 Bank for International Settlements.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0104. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Publications Group). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/boegvuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.