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The Funding for Lending Scheme

Author

Listed:
  • Churm, Rohan

    () (Bank of England)

  • Radia, Amar

    () (Bank of England)

  • Leake, Jeremy

    () (Bank of England)

  • Srinivasan, Sylaja

    () (Bank of England)

  • Whisker, Rishard

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

The Bank of England and HM Treasury launched the Funding for Lending Scheme (FLS) in order to encourage lending to households and companies. The FLS offers funding to banks and building societies for an extended period. And it encourages them to supply more credit by making more and cheaper funding available if they lend more. Easier access to bank credit should boost consumption and investment by households and businesses. In turn, increased economic activity should raise incomes. Early signs have been encouraging, as funding costs for UK banks have fallen sharply. But it will be some time before the impact of the FLS on lending is clear. The Bank is monitoring a range of indicators in order to assess the direct and indirect impacts of the Scheme.

Suggested Citation

  • Churm, Rohan & Radia, Amar & Leake, Jeremy & Srinivasan, Sylaja & Whisker, Rishard, 2012. "The Funding for Lending Scheme," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 306-320.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0088
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Button, Richard & Pezzini, Silvia & Rossiter, Neil, 2010. "Understanding the price of new lending to households," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(3), pages 172-182.
    2. Butt, Nicholas & Domit, Silvia & McLeay, Michael & Thomas, Ryland & Kirkham, Lewis, 2012. "What can the money data tell us about the impact of QE?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 321-331.
    3. Joyce, Michael & Tong, Matthew & Woods, Robert, 2011. "The United Kingdom’s quantitative easing policy: design, operation and impact," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(3), pages 200-212.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Butt, Nick & Churm, Rohan & McMahon, Michael & Morotz, Arpad & Schanz, Jochen, 2014. "QE and the bank lending channel in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 511, Bank of England.
    2. Olena Havrylchyk, 2016. "Incentivising Lending to Smes with the Funding for Lending Scheme: Some Evidence from Bank-Level Data in the United Kingdom," EconomiX Working Papers 2016-24, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    3. Alphandary, Alice, 2014. "Risk managing loan collateral at the Bank of England," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 190-201.
    4. Churm, Rohan & Joyce, Mike & Kapetanios, George & Theodoridis, Konstantinos, 2015. "Unconventional monetary policies and the macroeconomy: the impact of the United Kingdom's QE2 and Funding for Lending Scheme," Bank of England working papers 542, Bank of England.
    5. Michel Aglietta & Etienne Espagne, 2016. "Climate and finance systemic risks, more than an analogy? The climate fragility hypothesis," Working Papers 2016-10, CEPII research center.
    6. repec:sgm:jbfeuw:v:2:y:2015:i:4:p:14 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Beau, Emily & Hill, John & Hussain, Tanveer & Nixon, Dan, 2014. "Bank funding costs: what are they, what determines them and why do they matter?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 370-384.
    8. Hills, Robert & Hoggarth, Glenn, 2013. "Cross-border bank credit and global financial stability," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(2), pages 126-136.
    9. Chowla, Shiv & Quaglietti, Lucia & Rachel, Lukasz, 2014. "How have world shocks affected the UK economy?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 167-179.
    10. Butt, Nick & Pugh, Alice, 2014. "Credit spreads: capturing credit conditions facing households and firms," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(2), pages 137-148.
    11. William A. Allen, 2015. "Asset choice in British central banking history, the myth of the safe asset, and bank regulation," Journal of Banking and Financial Economics, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 2(4), pages 18-31, June.
    12. Bunn, Philip & Le Roux, Jeanne & Johnson, Robert & McLeay, Michael, 2012. "Influences on household spending: evidence from the 2012 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 332-342.
    13. Marianna Endresz & Peter Harasztosi & Robert P. Lieli, 2015. "The Impact of the Magyar Nemzeti Bank's Funding for Growth Scheme on Firm Level Investment," MNB Working Papers 2015/2, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    14. Werner, Richard A., 2014. "Enhanced Debt Management: Solving the eurozone crisis by linking debt management with fiscal and monetary policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(PB), pages 443-469.
    15. Butt, Nicholas & Domit, Silvia & McLeay, Michael & Thomas, Ryland & Kirkham, Lewis, 2012. "What can the money data tell us about the impact of QE?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 321-331.
    16. Samuel Wills, 2015. "Seven Principles for Managing Resource Wealth," Economics Series Working Papers OxCarre Research Paper 15, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    17. Samuel Wills, 2015. "Seven Principles for Managing Resource Wealth," OxCarre Working Papers 154, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    18. Harimohan, Rashmi & McLeay, Michael & Young, Garry, 2016. "Pass-through of bank funding costs to lending and deposit rates: lessons from the financial crisis," Bank of England working papers 590, Bank of England.
    19. Ryan-Collins, Josh & Werner, Richard A. & Castle, Jennifer, 2016. "A half-century diversion of monetary policy? An empirical horse-race to identify the UK variable most likely to deliver the desired nominal GDP growth rate," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 158-176.

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