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Measuring financial sector output and its contribution to UK GDP

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Abstract

In the decade before the financial crisis, the UK financial services sector grew more than twice as fast as the UK economy as a whole. But there are many conceptual difficulties associated with measuring output in finance. This article describes the contribution of the financial sector to GDP and assesses the uncertainty around recent estimates. There is some evidence that financial services output grew less quickly over the recent past than the official data suggest, although this probably had only a small impact on the rate of growth of overall GDP.

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  • Burgess, Stephen, 2011. "Measuring financial sector output and its contribution to UK GDP," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(3), pages 234-246.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0058
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    1. Charles Steindel, 2009. "Implications of the financial crisis for potential growth: past, present, and future," Staff Reports 408, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. J. Christina Wang & Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald, 2009. "A General-Equilibrium Asset-Pricing Approach to the Measurement of Nominal and Real Bank Output," NBER Chapters,in: Price Index Concepts and Measurement, pages 273-320 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert Inklaar & J. Christina Wang, 2013. "Real Output of Bank Services: What Counts is What Banks Do, Not What They Own," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 80(317), pages 96-117, January.
    4. Davies, Richard & Richardson, Peter & Katinaite, Vaiva & Manning, Mark, 2010. "Evolution of the UK banking system," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(4), pages 321-332.
    5. Benito, Andrew & Neiss, Katharine & Price, Simon & Rachel, Lukasz, 2010. "The impact of the financial crisis on supply," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(2), pages 104-114.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Wolf, 2014. "How the Financial Crisis Changed Our World," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 286-303, October.
    2. Mamatzakis, Emmanuel & Bermpei, Theodora, 2014. "What drives investment bank performance? The role of risk, liquidity and fees prior to and during the crisis," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 102-117.
    3. David Sondermann, 2014. "Productivity in the euro area: any evidence of convergence?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 999-1027, November.
    4. Nicholas Oulton & María Sebastiá-Barriel, 2013. "Long and Short-Term Effects of the Financial Crisis on Labour Productivity, Capital and Output," CEP Discussion Papers dp1185, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Clavero, Borja, 2017. "A contribution to the Quantity Theory of Disaggregated Credit," MPRA Paper 76657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Kamath, Kishore & Paul, Varun, 2011. "Understanding recent developments in UK external trade," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(4), pages 294-304.
    7. Nauro F Campos & Fabrizio Coricelli, 2017. "EU Membership, Mrs Thatcher’s Reforms and Britain’s Economic Decline," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 59(2), pages 169-193, June.
    8. Oulton, Nicholas, 2013. "Medium and long run prospects for UK growth in the aftermathof the financial crisis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58239, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. repec:spr:fininn:v:3:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40854-017-0060-2 is not listed on IDEAS

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