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The gray area: high school dropout likelihood among skin tone levels of black males

Author

Listed:
  • Yariv Fadlon

    (Claremont Graduate University Department of Economics 150 E 10th Street, Claremont, CA 91711 USA, e-mail: yariv.fadlon@cgu.edu)

  • Sophie Tripp

    (Claremont Graduate University, Department of Economics, 150 E 10th Street, Claremont, CA 91711 USA, e-mail: sophie.tripp@cgu.edu)

Abstract

We evaluate the role skin tone plays in the likelihood of dropping out of high school for black male respondents in the NLSY97. We find that blacks are 11 percent more likely to drop out of high school. This gap almost disappears after controlling for key family background variables. In addition, we find that light skinned blacks are less likely to drop out compared to whites, while dark skinned blacks are more likely to drop out compared to whites after controlling for the same family background variables. Therefore, after controlling for family background, the dropout likelihood of both light and dark skinned blacks “cancel out” and thus the bi-racial gap mistakenly seems to disappear.

Suggested Citation

  • Yariv Fadlon & Sophie Tripp, 2015. "The gray area: high school dropout likelihood among skin tone levels of black males," Econometrics Letters, Bilimsel Mektuplar Organizasyonu (Scientific letters), vol. 2(2), pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:bmo:bmoart:v:2:y:2015:i:2:p:1-11
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Kreisman & Marcos A. Rangel, 2015. "On the Blurring of the Color Line: Wages and Employment for Black Males of Different Skin Tones," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(1), pages 1-13, March.
    2. James J. Heckman & Paul A. LaFontaine, 2010. "The American High School Graduation Rate: Trends and Levels," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(2), pages 244-262, May.
    3. Arthur H. Goldsmith & Darrick Hamilton & William Darity Jr, 2006. "Shades of Discrimination: Skin Tone and Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 242-245, May.
    4. Joni Hersch, 2006. "Skin-Tone Effects among African Americans: Perceptions and Reality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 251-255, May.
    5. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Black-White Dropout; Skin Tone; FGLS.;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General

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