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Skin Tone and Self-Employment: is there an Intra-Group Variation among Blacks?

Author

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  • Srikant Devaraj

    () (Ball State University)

  • Pankaj C. Patel

    () (Villanova University)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to formally evaluate whether odds of entry into self-employment decrease as skin tone darkens for Blacks in the United States. Extending past work on inter-group differences in Black-White self-employment, based on data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, with darker skin tone the odds of self-employment decline. Having spent more time in labor force further decreases the likelihood of self-employment for darker skin tone Blacks, and being a high-school graduate, scoring high on Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), or higher past year income are not associated with self-employment of darker skin tone Blacks. While darker skin tone Blacks who are self-employed derive lower income, those who are self-employed and with more human capital (longer time spent in the labor force, scoring high on ASVAB or being a high school graduate) have a higher income.

Suggested Citation

  • Srikant Devaraj & Pankaj C. Patel, 2017. "Skin Tone and Self-Employment: is there an Intra-Group Variation among Blacks?," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 44(1), pages 137-166, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:blkpoe:v:44:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s12114-017-9249-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s12114-017-9249-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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