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Understanding Developing Country Strategic Responses to the Enhancement of Food Safety Standards

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  • Spencer Henson
  • Steven Jaffee

Abstract

This paper explores the competing concepts of ‘standards as barriers’ and ‘standards as catalysts’ in the context of food safety standards in international trade in agricultural and food products. Through a review of existing evidence of the impact of food safety standards on developing country exports of agricultural and food products and the results of a series of country‐ and product‐specific case studies, it is suggested that food safety standards can act as both a barrier to trade and the basis of competitive positioning for developing countries in international markets. This suggests that broad conclusions about the trade effects of food safety standards on developing countries are problematic, rather the level and ways in which agricultural and food exports are impacted can be product, country, standard and even firm‐specific.

Suggested Citation

  • Spencer Henson & Steven Jaffee, 2008. "Understanding Developing Country Strategic Responses to the Enhancement of Food Safety Standards," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 548-568, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:31:y:2008:i:4:p:548-568
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9701.2007.01034.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9701.2007.01034.x
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    1. Delgado, C.L. & Wada, N. & Rosegrant, M.W. & Meijer, S. & Ahmed, M., 2003. "Fish to 2020: supply and demand in changing global markets," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 15796, October.
    2. Josling, Timothy E. & Roberts, Donna & Orden, David, 2004. "Food Regulation And Trade: Toward A Safe And Open Global System -- An Overview And Synopsis," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20008, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Unnevehr, Laurian J., ed., 2003. "Food safety in food security and food trade:," 2020 vision focus 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Unknown, 2003. "International Trade And Food Safety: Economic Theory And Case Studies," Agricultural Economics Reports 33941, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Timothy E. Josling & Donna Roberts & David Orden, 2004. "Food Regulation and Trade: Toward a Safe and Open Global System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 347, October.
    6. John S. Wilson & Victor O. Abiola, 2003. "Standards and Global Trade : A Voice for Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15131, Juni.
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