IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/wbk/wbpubs/15131.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

Standards and Global Trade : A Voice for Africa

Author

Listed:
  • John S. Wilson
  • Victor O. Abiola

Abstract

The book provides information, and guidance for policymakers, the development community, and others in the critical area of "behind the border" barriers to trade. With a view to promoting efforts to strengthen Africa's capacity to meet trade standards, and comply with technical regulations, the book examines the link between those standards, and regulations and export success in case studies of five countries: Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. Each chapter describe the economic context of trade standards in a country, and examines the mechanisms by which standards, and regulations are established, and revised at the local, and international levels. The authors - local experts in the region - review existing trade regulations, and determine the extent to which they are consistent with international practices. They also analyze each country's physical infrastructure, organizational capacities, and current standard implementation process, and, consider the probable impact of new standards, regulations, and related production/marketing practices in key industries. The first comprehensive assessment of the relationship between trade standards, and development priorities in Sub-Saharan Africa, this book offers concrete action plans for supporting African firms, and farmers in their efforts to improve product quality, and reach international markets in key commodity sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • John S. Wilson & Victor O. Abiola, 2003. "Standards and Global Trade : A Voice for Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15131, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15131
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/15131/multi0page.pdf?sequence=1
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kareem, Olayinka Idowu, 2016. "Food safety regulations and fish trade: Evidence from European Union-Africa trade relations," Journal of Commodity Markets, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 18-25.
    2. Anne-Célia Disdier & Lionel Fontagné & Olivier Cadot, 2015. "North-South Standards Harmonization and International Trade," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(2), pages 327-352.
    3. J. Luis Guasch & Jean-Louis Racine & Isabel Sánchez & Makhtar Diop, 2007. "Quality Systems and Standards for a Competitive Edge," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6768.
    4. Johan F.M. Swinnen & Thijs Vandemoortele, 2009. "Trade, Development, and the Political Economy of Public Standards," LICOS Discussion Papers 23609, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    5. Olivier Cadot & Julien Gourdon, 2016. "Non-tariff measures, preferential trade agreements, and prices: new evidence," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(2), pages 227-249, May.
    6. Garcia Martinez, Marian & Poole, Nigel, 2004. "The development of private fresh produce safety standards: implications for developing Mediterranean exporting countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 229-255, June.
    7. Maertens, Miet & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2006. "Standards as Barriers and Catalysts for Trade and Poverty Reduction," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25772, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Olivier Cadot & Anne-Célia Disdier & Lionel Fontagné, 2012. "North-South Standards Harmonization and International Trade," Working Papers hal-00961733, HAL.
    9. van Wijk, J.C.A.C. & Danse, M. & van Tulder, R.J.M., 2008. "Making Retail Supply Chains Sustainable: Upgrading Opportunities for Developing Country Suppliers under Voluntary Quality Standards," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2008-080-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    10. Keith E. Maskus & Tsunehiro Otsuki & John S. Wilson, 2013. "Do foreign product standards matter? Impacts on costs for developing country exporters," Asia-Pacific Journal of Accounting & Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 37-57, March.
    11. M. Maertens & J. Swinnen, 2012. "Private Standards, the Organization of Global Supply Chains, and their Impact on Developing Countries," Chapters,in: Private Standards and Global Governance, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. repec:hal:cesptp:hal-00961733 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. L. Colen & M. Maertens & J. Swinnen, 2012. "Globalization, Private Standards and Poverty: Evidence from Senegal," Chapters,in: Private Standards and Global Governance, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Spencer Henson & Steven Jaffee, 2008. "Understanding Developing Country Strategic Responses to the Enhancement of Food Safety Standards," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 548-568, April.
    15. Paul Mwebaze & Jim Monaghan & Nicola Spence & Alan MacLeod & Martin Hare & Brian Revell, 2010. "Modelling the Risks Associated with the Increased Importation of Fresh Produce from Emerging Supply Sources Outside the EU to the UK," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 97-121.
    16. Neeliah, Shalini A. & Neeliah, Harris & Goburdhun, Daya, 2013. "Assessing the relevance of EU SPS measures to the food export sector: Evidence from a developing agro-food exporting country," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 53-62.
    17. -, 2010. "Experiencias de articulación entre los sectores público y privado para la implementación de tratados de libre comercio," Documentos de Proyectos 267, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    18. Salamat Ali, 2016. "Export Response to Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures and Technical Barriers to Trade: Firm-level Evidence from a Developing Country," Discussion Papers 2016-02, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15131. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.