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Population Migration and Team Loyalty in Professional Sports

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  • Scott Tainsky
  • Monika Stodolska

Abstract

Within the long line of inquiry on demand for sport, one area that has gone relatively unexamined is that of domestic migration. In this research, the relationship between population migration and team loyalty is explored. Copyright (c) 2010 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott Tainsky & Monika Stodolska, 2010. "Population Migration and Team Loyalty in Professional Sports," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(3), pages 801-815.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:91:y:2010:i:3:p:801-815
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    References listed on IDEAS

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