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The Gender Environmentalism Gap in Germany and the Netherlands

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  • Athina Economou
  • George Halkos

Abstract

Objective The present study attempts to shed some light on the environmental attitudes gap between the two genders in Germany and the Netherlands. Methods The article employs three alternative indicators of environmental attitudes, namely, “environmental values,” “environmental support,” and “environmental concern.” By using decomposition models, the underlying factors and their relative contribution in the observed gender gap in environmentalism are examined. Results The empirical results indicate that females exhibit higher pro‐environmental values but less environmental support and concerns than males. The findings are quite sensitive to the sample and the indicator examined. Conclusion The study contributes to the literature by examining not only the driving factors of gender environmental attitudes but their relative contribution as well. It seems that it is mainly differences in behavioral, psychological, and cultural responses between the two genders that shape the observed environmental attitudes gap and not differences in observed individual characteristics per se.

Suggested Citation

  • Athina Economou & George Halkos, 2020. "The Gender Environmentalism Gap in Germany and the Netherlands," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 101(3), pages 1038-1055, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:101:y:2020:i:3:p:1038-1055
    DOI: 10.1111/ssqu.12785
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