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The Role Of Social Grants In Mitigating The Socio-Economic Impact Of Hiv/Aids In Two Free State Communities

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  • FRIKKIE BOOYSEN
  • SERVAAS VAN DER BERG

Abstract

Social grants may play an important role in mitigating the impact of HIV/AIDS. Eligibility for these grants is driven in part by the increasing burden of chronic illness, the mounting orphan crisis and the impoverishment of households associated with the epidemic. This article investigates the role of social grants in mitigating the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS in South Africa, using data from a panel study on the household impact of the epidemic. Social grants reduce inequality and decrease the prevalence, depth and severity of poverty in affected households. However, these transfers also have disincentive effects on employment, while non-uptake is in some cases higher amongst the poorest. Copyright 2005 Economic Society of South Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Frikkie Booysen & Servaas Van Der Berg, 2005. "The Role Of Social Grants In Mitigating The Socio-Economic Impact Of Hiv/Aids In Two Free State Communities," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 73(s1), pages 545-563, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:73:y:2005:i:s1:p:545-563
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anne Case, 2004. "Does Money Protect Health Status? Evidence from South African Pensions," NBER Chapters,in: Perspectives on the Economics of Aging, pages 287-312 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Sonja Keller, 2004. "Household Formation, Poverty And Unemployment - The Case Of Rural Households In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(3), pages 437-483, September.
    3. Filmer, Deon*Pritchett, Lant, 1998. "Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data - or tears : with an application to educational enrollments in states of India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1994, The World Bank.
    4. Stephan Klasen & Ingrid Woolard, 2009. "Surviving Unemployment Without State Support: Unemployment and Household Formation in South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(1), pages 1-51, January.
    5. repec:pri:rpdevs:case_money_protect_nber is not listed on IDEAS
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    7. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan & Douglas Miller, 2003. "Public Policy and Extended Families: Evidence from Pensions in South Africa," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(1), pages 27-50, June.
    8. Haroon Bhorat, 2003. "Estimates for Poverty Alleviation in South Africa, with An Application to a Universal Income Grant," Working Papers 03075, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    9. Haroon Bhorat & Najma Shaikh, 2004. "Poverty and Labour Market Markers of HIV+ House holds: An Exploratory Methodological Analysis," Working Papers 04083, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    10. Megan Louw, 2003. "Orphans of the HIV/Aids epidemic: An impending crisis for South African development," Working Papers 01/2003, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mitra, Sophie, 2010. "Disability Cash Transfers in the Context of Poverty and Unemployment: The Case of South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 1692-1709, December.
    2. Miller, Candace M. & Tsoka, Maxton & Reichert, Kathryn, 2011. "The impact of the Social Cash Transfer Scheme on food security in Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 230-238, April.
    3. Wynand Carel Johannes Grobler & Steve Dunga, 2015. "Spending Patterns Of Food Secure And Food Insecure Households In Urban Areas: The Case Of Low Income Neighborhoods," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 1003641, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    4. Thurman, Tonya R. & Kidman, Rachel & Taylor, Tory M., 2015. "Bridging the gap: The impact of home visiting programs for orphans and vulnerable children on social grant uptake in South Africa," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 111-116.
    5. repec:spr:soinre:v:137:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1589-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. George Mutasa, 2012. "Disability Grant and Individual Labour Force Participation: The Case of South Africa," Working Papers 12156, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    7. Ssewamala, Fred M. & Han, Chang-Keun & Neilands, Torsten B., 2009. "Asset ownership and health and mental health functioning among AIDS-orphaned adolescents: Findings from a randomized clinical trial in rural Uganda," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 191-198, July.

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