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Asset Price Persistence and Real Estate Market Illiquidity: Evidence from Japanese Land Values

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  • John Krainer
  • Mark M. Spiegel
  • Nobuyoshi Yamori

Abstract

We develop an overlapping generations model of the real estate market in which search frictions and a debt overhang combine to generate price persistence and illiquidity. Illiquidity stems from heterogeneity in agent real estate valuations. The variance of agent valuations determines how quickly prices adjust following a shock to fundamentals. We examine the predictions of the model by studying price depreciation in Japanese land values subsequent to the 1990 stock market crash. Commercial land values fell much more quickly than residential land values. As we would posit that the variance of buyer valuations would be greater for residential real estate than for commercial real estate, this model matches the Japanese experience. Copyright (c) 2010 American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.

Suggested Citation

  • John Krainer & Mark M. Spiegel & Nobuyoshi Yamori, 2010. "Asset Price Persistence and Real Estate Market Illiquidity: Evidence from Japanese Land Values," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 171-196.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:38:y:2010:i:2:p:171-196
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Ka Yui LEUNG & Joe Cho Yiu NG, "undated". "Macro Aspects of Housing," ISER Discussion Paper 1030, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. David C. Ling & Andy Naranjo & Benjamin Scheick, 2014. "Investor Sentiment, Limits to Arbitrage and Private Market Returns," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 531-577, September.

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