IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/reesec/v36y2008i4p777-812.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Evidence of the Dual Nature of Property Value Recovery Following Environmental Remediation

Author

Listed:
  • Recai Aydin
  • Barton A. Smith

Abstract

The literature on home value diminution attributable to environmental degradation and its possible reversal typically ignores indirect effects upon neighborhood characteristics that can exacerbate the overall change in property values, resulting in underestimates of diminution and overestimates of recovery. Furthermore, to the extent that direct price effects and neighborhood transition effects respond differently to remediation efforts, the relatively new postremediation literature misses an important part of the recovery process. This study examines both direct and indirect effects and finds in the case of Houston Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites that, while the direct value impacts of proximity to toxic waste sites was significantly reduced after remediation, the indirect effects associated with induced demographic changes were much slower to reverse, producing a housing market inertia that stifled full home value recovery. Copyright 2008 American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association

Suggested Citation

  • Recai Aydin & Barton A. Smith, 2008. "Evidence of the Dual Nature of Property Value Recovery Following Environmental Remediation," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 777-812, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:36:y:2008:i:4:p:777-812
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1540-6229.2008.00230.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michaels, R. Gregory & Smith, V. Kerry, 1990. "Market segmentation and valuing amenities with hedonic models: The case of hazardous waste sites," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 223-242, September.
    2. Jill J. McCluskey & Gordon C. Rausser, 2003. "Stigmatized Asset Value: Is It Temporary or Long-Term?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(2), pages 276-285, May.
    3. Kohlhase, Janet E., 1991. "The impact of toxic waste sites on housing values," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 1-26, July.
    4. Michael Greenstone & Justin Gallagher, 2008. "Does Hazardous Waste Matter? Evidence from the Housing Market and the Superfund Program," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(3), pages 951-1003.
    5. J F Kain & J M Quigley, 1970. "Evaluating the quality of the residential environment," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 2(1), pages 23-32, January.
    6. Smith, Barton A., 1978. "Measuring the value of urban amenities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 370-387, July.
    7. McCluskey, Jill J. & Rausser, Gordon C., 2003. "Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 166-176, March.
    8. McMillen, Daniel P & Thorsnes, Paul, 2003. "The Aroma of Tacoma: Time-Varying Average Derivatives and the Effect of a Superfund Site on House Prices," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 21(2), pages 237-246, April.
    9. Kiel, Katherine & Zabel, Jeffrey, 2001. "Estimating the Economic Benefits of Cleaning Up Superfund Sites: The Case of Woburn, Massachusetts," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2-3), pages 163-184, March-May.
    10. Arthur C. Nelson & John Genereux & Michelle Genereux, 1992. "Price Effects of Landfills on House Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(4), pages 359-365.
    11. Polinsky, A Mitchell & Shavell, Steven, 1975. "The Air Pollution and Property Value Debate," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(1), pages 100-104, February.
    12. Douglas S. Noonan & Douglas J. Krupka & Brett M. Baden, 2007. "Neighborhood Dynamics And Price Effects Of Superfund Site Clean-Up," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(4), pages 665-692.
    13. Kent Messer & William Schulze & Katherine Hackett & Trudy Cameron & Gary McClelland, 2006. "Can Stigma Explain Large Property Value Losses? The Psychology and Economics of Superfund," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 33(3), pages 299-324, March.
    14. Ted Gayer & James T. Hamilton & W. Kip Viscusi, 2000. "Private Values Of Risk Tradeoffs At Superfund Sites: Housing Market Evidence On Learning About Risk," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 439-451, August.
    15. Bender, Bruce & Gronberg, Timothy J & Hwang, Hae-Shin, 1980. "Choice of Functional Form and the Demand for Air Quality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(4), pages 638-643, November.
    16. Larry Dale & James C. Murdoch & Mark A. Thayer & Paul A. Waddell, 1999. "Do Property Values Rebound from Environmental Stigmas? Evidence from Dallas," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(2), pages 311-326.
    17. Greenberg, M & Hughes, J, 1992. "The Impact of Hazardous Waste Superfund Sites on the Value of Houses Sold in New Jersey," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 26(2), pages 147-153, June.
    18. Gayer, Ted & Kip Viscusi, W., 2002. "Housing price responses to newspaper publicity of hazardous waste sites," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 33-51, February.
    19. Gerald E. Smolen & Gary Moore & Lawrence V. Conway, 1992. "Economic Effects of Hazardous Chemical and Proposed Radioactive Waste Landfills on Surrounding Real Estate Values," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 7(3), pages 283-296.
    20. Katherine A. Kiel, 1995. "Measuring the Impact of the Discovery and Cleaning of Identified Hazardous Waste Sites on House Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(4), pages 428-435.
    21. Mark Thayer & Heidi Albers & Morteza Rahmatian, 1992. "The Benefits of Reducing Exposure to Waste Disposal Sites: A Hedonic Housing Value Approach," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 7(3), pages 265-282.
    22. Robert J. Anderson JR & Thomas D. Crocker, 1971. "Air Pollution and Residential Property Values," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 8(3), pages 171-180, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:36:y:2008:i:4:p:777-812. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/areueea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.