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Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates

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  • McCluskey, Jill J.
  • Rausser, Gordon C.

Abstract

The dynamic effect of a hazardous waste site is analyzed by investigating the causal relationship between housing appreciation rates and house location in relation to a hazardous waste site using resale data from individual sales transactions in Dallas County, Texas. The results indicate that in the period in which the hazardous waste site was identified and cleanup occurred, residential property owners in close proximity to the hazardous waste site experienced lower housing appreciation rates. In the first post-cleanup period, they gained some of the lost ground with a higher appreciation rate. In a subsequent post-cleanup period, their appreciation fell in line with property owners whose properties are located farther away from the hazardous waste site. This suggests that a long-run equilibrium has been reached since appreciation rates were not significantly different across the Dallas housing market in the second post-cleanup period. Although the results indicate that adjustment takes time, an equilibrium is eventually reached for the houses in this repeat sales data set. An important implication of our analysis is that since the post-cleanup recovery was not immediate, property owners should be compensated for their loss of liquidity.
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  • McCluskey, Jill J. & Rausser, Gordon C., 2003. "Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 166-176, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:45:y:2003:i:2:p:166-176
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    1. Kohlhase, Janet E., 1991. "The impact of toxic waste sites on housing values," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 1-26, July.
    2. Alan K. Reichert & Michael Small & Sunil Mohanty, 1992. "The Impact of Landfills on Residential Property Values," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 7(3), pages 297-314.
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    5. Larry Dale & James C. Murdoch & Mark A. Thayer & Paul A. Waddell, 1999. "Do Property Values Rebound from Environmental Stigmas? Evidence from Dallas," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(2), pages 311-326.
    6. Palmquist, Raymond B., 1982. "Measuring environmental effects on property values without hedonic regressions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 333-347, May.
    7. Katherine A. Kiel, 1995. "Measuring the Impact of the Discovery and Cleaning of Identified Hazardous Waste Sites on House Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(4), pages 428-435.
    8. Jill J. McCluskey & Gordon C. Rausser, 2001. "Estimation of Perceived Risk and Its Effect on Property Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(1), pages 42-55.
    9. Arthur C. Nelson & John Genereux & Michelle Genereux, 1992. "Price Effects of Landfills on House Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(4), pages 359-365.
    10. Mendelsohn, Robert & Hellerstein, Daniel & Huguenin, Michael & Unsworth, Robert & Brazee, Richard, 1992. "Measuring hazardous waste damages with panel models," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 259-271, May.
    11. Gerald E. Smolen & Gary Moore & Lawrence V. Conway, 1992. "Economic Effects of Hazardous Chemical and Proposed Radioactive Waste Landfills on Surrounding Real Estate Values," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 7(3), pages 283-296.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arnott, Richard & Hochman, Oded & Rausser, Gordon C., 2008. "Pollution and land use: Optimum and decentralization," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 390-407, September.
    2. Yuichi Ishimura & Kenji Takeuchi, 2017. "Does conflict matter? Spatial distribution of disposal sites in Japan," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 19(1), pages 99-120, January.
    3. Katherine Kiel, 2006. "Environmental Contamination and House Values: A Study of Market Adjustment," Working Papers 0607, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    4. Michael Greenstone & Justin Gallagher, 2008. "Does Hazardous Waste Matter? Evidence from the Housing Market and the Superfund Program," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(3), pages 951-1003.
    5. Xu, Minhong & Xu, Yilan, 2017. "Environmental Hazards and Mortgage Credit Risk: Evidence from Texas Pipeline Incidents," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258019, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Recai Aydin & Barton A. Smith, 2008. "Evidence of the Dual Nature of Property Value Recovery Following Environmental Remediation," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 777-812, December.
    7. Ralph Mastromonaco, 2014. "Hazardous Waste Hits Hollywood: Superfund and Housing Prices in Los Angeles," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 59(2), pages 207-230, October.
    8. Amnon Levy, 2009. "Environmental Health And Choice Of Residence," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 50-64, March.
    9. Modica, Marco, 2017. "Does the construction of biogas plants affect local property values?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 169-172.
    10. Wernstedt, Kris & Heberle, Lauren & Alberini, Anna & Meyer, Peter, 2004. "The Brownfields Phenomenon: Much Ado about Something or the Timing of the Shrewd?," Discussion Papers 10660, Resources for the Future.
    11. Yuichi Ishimura & Kenji Takeuchi, 2015. "Spatial Distribution of Disposal SitesĀ¦ Empirical Evidence from Japan," Discussion Papers 1523, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    12. Forslund, Johanna & Samakovlis, Eva & Vredin Johansson, Maria, 2006. "Matters Risk? The Allocation of Government Subsidies for Remediation of Contaminated Sites under the Local Investment Programme," Working Papers 94, National Institute of Economic Research.
    13. Robin R. Jenkins & Elizabeth Kopits & David Simpson, 2006. "Measuring the Social Benefits of EPA Land Cleanup and Reuse Programs," NCEE Working Paper Series 200603, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Sep 2006.
    14. John Braden & Xia Feng & DooHwan Won, 2011. "Waste Sites and Property Values: A Meta-Analysis," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 50(2), pages 175-201, October.
    15. repec:eee:jhouse:v:36:y:2017:i:c:p:62-72 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Wernstedt, Kris & Alberini, Anna & Heberle, Lauren & Meyer, Peter, 2004. "The Brownfields Phenomenon: Much Ado about Something or the Timing of the Shrewd?," Discussion Papers dp-04-46, Resources For the Future.
    17. Kris Wernstedt, 2004. "Overview of Existing Studies on Community Impacts of Land Reuse," NCEE Working Paper Series 200406, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Jun 2004.
    18. Franco, Sofia & Cutter, Bowman & DeWoody, Autumn, 2010. "Do Parking Requirements Significantly Increase The Area Dedicated To Parking? A Test Of The Effect Of Parking Requirements Values In Los Angeles County," MPRA Paper 20403, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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