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Work for Passion or Money? Variations in Artists’ Labor Supply

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  • Trine Bille
  • Knut Løyland
  • Anders Holm

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  • Trine Bille & Knut Løyland & Anders Holm, 2017. "Work for Passion or Money? Variations in Artists’ Labor Supply," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(3), pages 347-380, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:70:y:2017:i:3:p:347-380
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/kykl.12141
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    2. Jacob Mincer & Solomon Polachek, 1974. "Family Investments in Human Capital: Earnings of Women," NBER Chapters, in: Marriage, Family, Human Capital, and Fertility, pages 76-110, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769.
    5. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, June.
    6. Lasse Steiner & Lucian Schneider, 2013. "The happy artist: an empirical application of the work-preference model," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(2), pages 225-246, May.
    7. Shishko, Robert & Rostker, Bernard, 1976. "The Economics of Multiple Job Holding," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(3), pages 298-308, June.
    8. Garrett, Thomas A. & Sobel, Russell S., 1999. "Gamblers favor skewness, not risk: Further evidence from United States' lottery games," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 85-90, April.
    9. Tsiang, S C, 1972. "The Rationale of the Mean-Standard Deviation Analysis, Skewness Preference, and the Demand for Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(3), pages 354-371, June.
    10. Filer, Randall K, 1986. "The "Starving Artist"-Myth or Reality? Earnings of Artists in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(1), pages 56-75, February.
    11. Scott Stern, 2004. "Do Scientists Pay to Be Scientists?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(6), pages 835-853, June.
    12. Maurizio Caserta & Tiziana Cuccia, 2001. "The Supply of Arts Labour : Towards a Dynamic Approach," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 25(3), pages 185-201, August.
    13. Bille, Trine & Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld & Frey, Bruno S. & Steiner, Lasse, 2013. "Happiness in the arts—International evidence on artists’ job satisfaction," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 15-18.
    14. Sloane, Peter J, 1971. "The Economics of Professional Football: The Football Club as a Utility Maximiser," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 18(2), pages 121-146, June.
    15. Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "The Economics of Superstars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 845-858, December.
    16. David Throsby, 1996. "Economic circumstances of the performing artist: Baumol and Bowen thirty years on," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 20(3), pages 225-240, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joanna Woronkowicz & Aparna Soni & Seth Freedman & Kosali Simon, 2020. "How have recent health insurance expansions affected coverage among artist occupations in the USA?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 44(1), pages 117-154, March.
    2. Marchenko, Maria & Sonnabend, Hendrik, 2020. "Artists’ Labour Market and Gender: Evidence from German visual artists," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 307, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    3. Maria Marchenko & Hendrik Sonnabend, 2020. "Artists’ Labour Market and Gender: Evidence from German visual artists," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp307, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.

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